State-by-State Colorectal Cancer Screening Landscape

This resource, developed by Exact Sciences, provides a snapshot of the colorectal cancer screening landscape in each state while also putting into context how the different states compare with each other in a range of areas. While the majority of the information included is publicly available, it is difficult to find all this information in one place. This resource is intended to help people better understand what the CRC screening landscape – from coverage to screening rates to legislation – looks like in each state.

Evaluation: The last slide includes reference links for the included information. This involved considerable time and research across multiple websites and through research from Exact Sciences’ legal team.

Permissions: Made publicly available online by Exact Sciences.

Publication date: November 2019; updated August 2020

Post date: November 3, 2020

Contact: Submit comments, questions, and suggestions to Bryan Goettel: bgoettel@exactsciences.com.

Colorectal Cancer Burden Shifting To Younger Individuals: A Close Look At What The Most Recent Data Tells Us About Colorectal Cancer Incidence, Mortality, And Screening Rates – May 18, 2020

This webinar provided a close look at the findings from Colorectal Cancer Statistics 2020, a recent American Cancer Society publication released on March 5, 2020. According to the report, the burden of colorectal cancer is swiftly shifting to younger individuals as incidence increases in young adults and declines in older age groups. Additional report findings include the median age of diagnosis has dropped from age 72 in 2001-2002 to age 66 during 2015-2016 and half of all new diagnoses in people 66 or younger. The publication is accompanied by a consumer version, Colorectal Cancer Facts & Figures and a press release is also available. Learn about these findings and more in this webinar featuring report lead author Rebecca Siegel, MPH.

Speakers:

  • Rebecca Siegel, MPH, Scientific  Director, Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Inc.
  • Robert Smith, PhD, Senior Vice President, Cancer Screening, American Cancer Society, Inc. (Moderator)

Advanced Colorectal Polyp Brief

The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable created the Advanced Colorectal Polyp GI Brief to help endoscopists and primary care clinicians identify patients with advanced colorectal polyps, understand the epidemiology and associated risk factors, and most importantly know the risks of colorectal neoplasia for patients with advanced colorectal polyps and their first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children).

This brief aims to:

  1. Remind endoscopists that patients with an advanced colorectal polyp and their close relatives are at increased risk for advanced colorectal polyps and colorectal cancer;
  2. Keep endoscopists up to date with current guidelines; and,
  3. Provide template letters to communicate colonoscopy and pathology results, risk status, and follow-up recommendations for patients and close relatives.

Supplemental template letters: 

Learn more on how gastroenterologists and endoscopists can play a role in the national efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening rates:

2019 Colorectal Cancer Screening Messaging Guidebook: Recommended Messages to Reach the Unscreened

In 2018, the NCCRT and the American Cancer Society researched screened and unscreened populations to better understand and address screening disparities. The goals of the market research were to:

  • Measure general awareness of colorectal cancer screening methods.
  • Understand the rationale, attitudes, and motivations for being screened or not.
  • Analyze priority populations such as adults aged 50-54, rural dwellers, and the marketplace insured.
  • Identify logical and emotional drivers that could encourage screening.
  • Use the drivers to create and test messages that would motivate unscreened individuals.

This guidebook shares the findings and recommendations gathered from that research and is further designed to help in the education, empowerment, and mobilization of those who are not getting screened for colorectal cancer. Our hope is that our partners can take this research and the recommended messaging provided to strengthen your own communications campaigns, creating resources that resonate with the target audiences even more by using your own creativity, innovation and spokespersons.

The NCCRT would like to thank the Public Awareness and Social Media Task Group members who participated in the conceptualization of this Guidebook’s research and content. Also, a very special thank you to the 80% in Every Community Market Research Advisory Group for their participation, expertise, and oversight. 

Other Guides and Resources: 

The Hispanics/Latinos and Colorectal Cancer Companion Guide and Asian Americans and Colorectal Cancer Companion Guide introduce market research about the unscreened from these populations and include tested messages in Spanish and several Asian languages. The 2017 Communications Guidebook is also still a useful resource for developing your messaging campaigns. 

2019 Messaging Guidebook – Table of Contents (Section Downloads Below)

Other tools were developed during the 80% by 2018 campaign and can still help you promote and evaluate your communications:

More communications tools and resources will be coming soon!

 

Prevent Colon Cancer Throughout Your Life Poster

This poster from the Colon Cancer Prevention Project illustrates steps to prevent colorectal cancer throughout the life course.

The poster can be customized to include a local organization logo. See Contact section below for more information on how to use this resource in your own practice, office, or other location.

Evaluation: The content and messaging was developed based on the American Cancer Society’s 2018 Colorectal Cancer Screening Guideline and other evidence-based sources. 

Permissions: Made publicly available online by the Colon Cancer Prevention Project. See Contact section below for more information. 

Publication date: 2018

Post date: December 18, 2018

Contact:For partnership inquiries or for information regarding how you might use this infographic in your own practice, office, or other location, please contact Katie Pilkington at kpilkington@kickingbutt.org.

 

Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit to Detect Familial, Hereditary, and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer – June 19, 2018

This webinar introduced a new NCCRT resource for primary care providers, Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit to Detect Familial, Hereditary and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer.  The new toolkit aims to improve the ability of primary care clinicians to systematically collect, document, and act on a family history of CRC and adenomas polyps, while also educating clinicians on the need for more timely diagnostic testing for young adults who present with alarm signs or symptoms of CRC and ensuring that those patients receive a proper diagnostic work up.  Speakers include:

  • Emily Edelman, MS, CGC, Associate Director, Clinical & Continuing Education, The Jackson Laboratory;
  • Dennis Ahnen, MD, Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado School of Medicine, NCCRT Steering Committee, NCCRT Co-Chair Family History and Early Age Onset CRC Task Group;
  • Paul Schroy, MD, MPH,  Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, NCCRT Co-Chair Family History and Early Age Onset CRC Task Group;
  • Thomas Weber, MD, Director of Surgical Oncology, Northwest Region at Northwell Health, NCCRT Chair Emeritus, NCCRT Co-Chair Family History and Early Age Onset CRC Task Group. 

 

Risk Assessment And Screening Toolkit To Detect Familial, Hereditary And Early Onset Colorectal Cancer

Limited or inaccurate family history collection and risk assessment is a major barrier to successful cancer screening. Individuals who have a first-degree relative with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at least two times more likely to develop CRC, with the risk increasing with earlier ages of diagnosis and the number of relatives diagnosed with CRC. Therefore, screening and prevention efforts must focus on those with familial or hereditary risk, which requires collecting the necessary family history information for risk assessment. Primary care clinicians play a pivotal role in identifying people at increased CRC risk and facilitating recommended screening.

This new NCCRT toolkit aims to improve the ability of primary care clinicians to systematically collect, document, and act on a family history of CRC and adenomas polyps, while also educating clinicians on the need for more timely diagnostic testing for young adults who present with alarm signs or symptoms of CRC and ensuring that those patients receive a proper diagnostic work up. This toolkit serves as a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to improve operations within practices and suggests many useful resources and tools to aid these changes. 

Companion Quick Start Guide

Accompanying the full toolkit is a short, quick start guide with recommendations on how to ease into the transition process, while still making the critical improvements necessary for successful system-wide implementation. 

Thank you to the outstanding work and guidance provided from the NCCRT Family History and Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group and the smaller project advisory group. Also, thank you to the excellent work from our project developers at The Jackson Laboratory. 

 

Dr. Richard Wender’s Overview Message on American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Screening Guideline

Within this brief overview video, Dr. Richard Wender, American Cancer Society Chief Cancer Control Officer and NCCRT Chair, discusses the new colorectal cancer screening guideline from the American Cancer Society. He provides key takeaways from the guideline, informs on the evidence-base that supports the update, and addresses common questions about the new guideline. 

Colorectal Cancer Screening Guideline Update – May 30, 2018

 On May 30, 2018, the American Cancer Society released a new colorectal cancer screening guideline, published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. The new guideline recommends that adults at average risk for colorectal cancer start regular screening at age 45. The guideline was changed, based in part, on new data showing rates of colorectal cancer are increasing in younger populations.  As a result, the American Cancer Society updated the guideline to save more lives by finding colorectal cancer early, when treatment is more likely to be successful and by detecting and removing polyps, which contributes to the prevention of colorectal cancer. 

This webinar assists NCCRT members and 80% partners by answering common questions, reviewing the evidence-base behind the guideline, and discussing how it will apply in a clinical setting.  

Speakers:

  • Rich Wender, MD, Chief Cancer Control Officer, ACS, National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) Chair
  • Robert Smith, PhD, VP, Cancer Screening, ACS, NCCRT Co-Chair
  • Durado Brooks, MD, MPH, VP of Cancer Control Interventions, NCCRT Steering Committee/Co-Chair Community Health Center Task Group
  • Caroline Powers, Federal Affairs Director, ACS CAN

Additional Resources: 

Identifying High Risk Patients and Families in Your Practice

In What can Gastroenterologists & Endoscopists Do to Advance 80% by 2018?, we describe the key role that gastroenterologists and endoscopists play in the national effort to make sure 80% of age-appropriate adults are regularly screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.

Identifying high risk patients and families is another key step you can take to ensure your patients and their families receive timely and appropriate screening. This supplemental guide is meant to aid you in these efforts.