80% In Every Community in Health Centers: Soaring to New Heights

August 5, 2019 – Author: Heather M. Brandt, PhD

August 4-10, 2019 is National Health Center Week (NHCW) and this year’s theme is “America’s Health Centers: Rooted in Communities.” Heath centers serve all people, regardless of who they are, where they are from, and whether or not they have health insurance. For this reason, health centers play a critical role in providing primary and preventive care services to adults who might not otherwise have access to these services, including colorectal cancer screening. Learn more about our nation’s health centers and the care they provide to 28 million patients – or 1 in every 12 people – in every state, territory, and the District of Columbia.

What better week than NHCW to reflect on the incredible progress health centers are making in the fight against colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer screening rates in health centers have climbed by 12 percentage points (rising from 30.2% in 2012 to 42% in 2017) since health centers began reporting colorectal cancer screening rates through the Uniform Data System (UDS) in 2012. Today you’ll hear from Heather M. Brandt, PhD, about local successes in achieving 80% screening rates in health centers in South Carolina.

Dr. Brandt is professor of health promotion, education, and behavior in the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. She is the program director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in South Carolina.

 Additional contributors to this work include Hiluv S. Johnson, LMSW, program coordinator, and Cynthia Calef, MAML, a program implementer, with the Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in South Carolina. We also wish to acknowledge Dr. Crystal Maxwell, Chief Medical Officer of Sandhills Medical Foundation and Kim Hale, Senior Manager of State and Primary Care Systems with the American Cancer Society.

Over the last four years, the Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in South Carolina has worked with eight federally-qualified health center systems and partners in South Carolina to implement evidence-based interventions to increase colorectal cancer screening. When we take a look at the impact of the program within the FQHCs systems in which we work, we have seen an average increase of 17 percentage points in colorectal cancer screening rates from 2015 to 2018. Among the eight health centers that have worked with us the longest, we have seen an average increase of 24 percentage points in this same time frame. While this is a great success, most of our partners fall well below the national 80% goal – but the progress is remarkable and a credit to the hard work and dedication of our health center partners to prevent and detect colorectal cancer early among the clients they serve. How did we land here?

As one of my colleagues (Dr. Karen Kim, University of Chicago) has said, over the past four years of work, supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Colorectal Cancer Control Program, we have been building a plane while we were flying it. I like to add that we knew we were building a plane, and we knew we wanted the plane to fly and keep flying after the end of the grant. In reviewing our progress, we have built a fine plane that continues to be tweaked as we confront new challenges together. One of the health center systems that has been traveling with us on this journey is Sandhills Medical Foundation, and this health center system has soared to new heights.

Sandhills Medical Foundation has been providing quality comprehensive health care since 1977 as a federally-qualified health center serving rural and largely low-income residents of Chesterfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, and Sumter Counties in South Carolina. Two health center locations – Lugoff and McBee – have been a part of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in South Carolina. However, the processes and approaches implemented in these two sites were implemented system-wide. Sandhills Medical Foundation implemented priority, evidence-based interventions of provider reminders and provider assessment and feedback as well as supportive strategies (small media, professional education, training, and technical assistance) and additional activities (signing the 80% Pledge, policy implementation, and developing champions). Facilitation of new system-level changes with a commitment from health center partners, dedicated designated colorectal cancer champions, strong leadership from their system’s Chief Medical Officer (Dr. Crystal Maxwell), implementation of evidence-based interventions, and a standard operating procedure for colorectal cancer screening were all key ingredients. Designated staff members helped to ensure that the process for colorectal cancer screening was being followed. You could consider these important elements of an effective pre-flight checklist.

We highlight successes, leaders, best practices, and tools that are making an impact in the nationwide movement to reach 80% screened for colorectal cancer.

Do you have a suggestion for a future blog topic? We welcome you to share your suggestions by emailing nccrt@cancer.org.

BLOG POLICY

Opinions expressed in these blog posts are that of the author and do not represent policies of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable or the author’s institution.

Our staff moderate all comments on the 80% Blog. While we do not censor based on point of view, we will delete or edit comments that are offensive or off topic. Click here to view full version.

“We offer colorectal cancer screening at every visit and every type of colorectal cancer screening to our patients. Anything and any way to get them screened!”

Amy Collin, LPN Quality Improvement Director at Sandhills Medical Foundation

Dr. Crystal Maxwell (left), Chief Medical Officer, and Amy Collins (right), CQI Nursing Director, Sandhills Medical Foundation

Based on 2018 data, Sandhills Medical Foundation – as a health center system – is one of two health center systems in South Carolina to have achieved the national goal of 80%. Also based on 2018 data, Lugoff and McBee’s annual colorectal cancer screening rates reached 83%. Dr. Maxwell has attributed the success in exceeding the 80% goal to strong commitment at all levels of the health center system.

Cindy Calef, program implementer with the Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in South Carolina, stated, “We had the pleasure of working directly with two of the four adult primary health care sites of Sandhills Medical Foundation – Lugoff and McBee. I have enjoyed working with the dedicated staff at these sites since 2015. Both of these sites have strong leadership and colorectal cancer champions dedicated to their patients.”

It is safe to say the plane is flying and appears to be on a flight path for future success as evidenced by the achievements of Sandhills Medical Foundation. Fasten your seat belts as we continue to work with our health centers to achieve their goals – and prevent and detect colorectal cancer early through screening.

Lastly, if you work in or with health centers, I strongly encourage you to check out NCCRT’s signature resource for health centers, Steps for Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates: A Manual for Community Health Centers, as well as other resources in the NCCRT Resource Center, which offer step-by-step instructions on how to implement evidence-based strategies to increase screening in a variety of settings.

We hope you’ll join us in sharing a round of applause for our nation’s health centers. Visit www.healthcenterweek.org to learn more about National Health Center Week and find ways to show your appreciation for their work.

Staff at McBee Clinic

Interview with NOELA Community Health Center—Grand Prize Recipient of the 2019 80% by 2018 National Achievement Award

May 23, 2019 – Author: Keith Winfrey, MD, MPH

Keith-Winfrey 2018New Orleans East Louisiana Community Health Clinic is this year’s Grand Prize recipient of the 80% by 2018 National Achievement Awards, a program designed to recognize individuals and organizations who are dedicating their time, talent and expertise to advancing needed initiatives that support the shared goal to achieve colorectal cancer screening rates of 80% and higher.

Dr. Keith Winfrey is the Chief Medical Officer for the New Orleans East Louisiana Community Health Center (NOELA CHC). He is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Tulane University School of Medicine, having completed his residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Preventive Medicine at the Tulane University School of Medicine. He also holds a Masters’ Degree in Health System Management from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Dr. Winfrey has been with NOELA CHC since 2009 and has served as the Chief Medical Officer since 2011. He has guided NOELA CHC through the practice transformation process to become a Level III “Patient-Centered Medical Home” and to improve the health center’s efficiency and effectiveness in chronic disease management and disease prevention.

Dr. Winfrey serves on the steering committee for the Louisiana Colorectal Roundtable, the clinical committee for the Taking Aim at Cancer Louisiana initiative, and is the current Clinical Branch Chairman for the Louisiana Primary Care Association.

In May 2019, Dr. Winfrey received AstraZeneca’s Cancer Community (C2) Catalyst for Change Award. This 4-minute video describes his work and offers a glimpse into the community served by NOELA CHC.

Hi, Dr. Winfrey! We’re excited to feature your work on the 80% Blog. Can you tell us a little about yourself and how you ended up working on colorectal cancer screening?
It’s an honor to share our story with you. I’ve had an interest in individual and population-based medicine since completing a dual-residency in Internal & Preventive Medicine at Tulane School of Medicine 17 years ago. After returning to New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, I joined the medical staff at Tulane School of Medicine and was later assigned to the Tulane Community Health Center – New Orleans East. [The name was later changed to New Orleans East Louisiana CHC in 2012]. In 2013, while we were preparing our 2012 UDS report (the first year that the Health Resources and Services Administration included colorectal cancer screening as a Uniform Data System measure for community health center grantees), the initial analysis revealed that our health center had a 3% colorectal cancer screening rate. That’s when colorectal cancer screening became a priority for us. In 2014, our health center began working with the American Cancer Society and later learned about the NCCRT‘s 80% by 2018 initiative. We signed the pledge and adjusted our goal to coincide with the NCCRT’s mission.

Tell us a little bit about NOELA Community Health Center.
NOELA CHC was initially founded by Tulane University School of Medicine in August 2008. We are located in a diverse, low-income, community which consists predominately of Vietnamese, African-American and Latino residents and we average over 14,000 encounters per year. We care for close to 4,000 unique patients per year, 78% of whom fall below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) and 60% have incomes at or below the FPL. Our health center strives to offer comprehensive primary and preventive health services for the entire family. In particular, we provide adult and pediatric primary, preventive, and behavioral health care services, OB/Gyn services, and chronic disease management for conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and hepatitis B and C. We employ the patient-centered medical home model, and our preventive care services include health education and initiatives to improve immunization and cancer screening rates.

We highlight successes, leaders, best practices, and tools that are making an impact in the nationwide movement to reach 80% screened for colorectal cancer.

Do you have a suggestion for a future blog topic? We welcome you to share your suggestions by emailing nccrt@cancer.org.

BLOG POLICY

Opinions expressed in these blog posts are that of the author and do not represent policies of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable or the author’s institution.

Our staff moderate all comments on the 80% Blog. While we do not censor based on point of view, we will delete or edit comments that are offensive or off topic. Click here to view full version.

NOELA-CHC

What activities and systems changes did you implement, and how did you choose them?
Our first priority for improving colorectal cancer screening rates was to adopt a certified electronic health record that we would use to measure screening rates and one with the capability of producing disease registries. We then developed a registry of patients that were either due for colorectal cancer screening or up to date with screening and identified the method in which screening was satisfied. Next, we stressed to our providers the importance of their recommendation in motivating patients to take action. From there, we hired several essential staff members, including a quality improvement director and several patient navigators. Once the foundation was in place, we then began adding various evidenced-based interventions (EBIs) until we found the ones that worked best for us. The EBIs or strategies that were most effective were promoting stool-based testing using a global opportunistic-based approach and providing regular patient and provider reminders. The patient reminders were provided by mailings and over the phone and the provider reminders occurred in the form of pre-visit planning reports. Practice assessment and feedback was provided monthly, and we developed new data analysis and reporting as we went along.  

I understand you began working with two area hospitals to establish an Open Access Endoscopy (OAE) agreement. How did this work?
Yes, along with members of the Louisiana Colorectal Cancer Roundtable and the Louisiana Primary Care Association, we identified the endoscopy providers most commonly utilized by our local Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). We then proceeded to meet with them to discuss the referral process and identify opportunities for improving efficiency. Through this process, we were able to understand the most important barriers the endoscopist encountered when screening our patients. These barriers included ensuring patients achieved an adequate bowel prep, minimizing “no-shows”, identifying patients’ co-morbidities and anesthesia risk, and ensuring the patient had reliable transportation. As a result of several meetings, we were able to reach an OAE agreement with one provider that allowed our patients to forgo the pre-procedure encounter with the endoscopist and be placed directly on the endoscopy schedule as long as certain key criteria were met. This greatly improved efficiency for our low-risk patients that were willing to undergo screening colonoscopy.

What success have you seen? How did you measure that success?
Over the course of six years, we’ve seen our overall colorectal cancer screening rate increase from 3% in 2012 to 80% by 2018. This has been in large part a result of annual stool-based testing. However, we’ve also seen a significant increase in patients completing screening colonoscopy. What’s been even more encouraging is to see patients that were initially only interested in stool-based testing, after two or three years, develop the courage to complete a screening colonoscopy.

What tips would you offer to others that are working to increase colorectal cancer screening in underserved communities?
When working with underserved communities, patience and repetition is key. Be prepared to repeat your message frequently and in various forms before the patient actually follows through with the test. Providers must initiate the discussion around risk factors, family history, and acceptable screening modalities and ancillary staff should support the provider’s recommendations. Next, consider using motivational interviewing techniques to meet patients where they are with regards to their understanding and willingness to undergo screening and then focus on offering the screening test that they are most likely to complete. Finally, it’s important to ensure that your organization has the proper foundation in place to support high-quality screening (i.e. “buy-in” from administration, a certified electronic health record, the right complementary staff, and a reliable tracking mechanism).

Were there tools, trainings or resources that you found helpful?
Yes. The article “Strategies for Expanding Colorectal Cancer Screening at Community Health Centers” by Sarfaty, Doroshenk, et al was the initial resource that we used to develop our plan. Later the “How to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in Practice: A Primary Care Clinician’s Evidence-Based Toolbox and Guide, 2008” and the “80% by 2018 Communications Guidebook: Recommended Messaging to Reach the Unscreened” were resources that were used to identify various evidenced-based interventions that we later employed.

Do you have any final tips for our readers that are working to achieve 80% in Every Community? 
I hope our story inspires other organizations to believe that improvements in colorectal cancer screening are possible. Improving screening rates can seem deceptively simple in the beginning but can become frustrating and discouraging when change is not quickly recognized. Take the time to prepare your team and organization, set realistic and achievable goals, and celebrate successes. Finally, if something is not working for your population, change it! Each community is different, so it’s important for each institution to understand which messages their patient population will be most likely to respond to and focus on it.

Thank you for sharing your story with us! We look forward to hearing more about your work and NOELA Community Health Clinic’s progress in the future.

80% Partner Survey Highlights Pledged Partner Progress And Success

December 19, 2018 – Author:Rich Killewald, Senior Data Manager, Cancer Control Intervention at the American Cancer Society

Rich Killewald is the Senior Data Manager, Cancer Control Intervention at the American Cancer Society. In this role, he manages data and information for a suite of community-based initiatives to increase access to cancer screenings and reduce cancer-related disparities in underserved communities. Throughout his career, Rich has held a number of data management, analysis, and program evaluation positions in regional and nationwide nonprofit organizations. Rich holds a Master of Nonprofit Management degree from Regis University in Denver, CO. He lives in Phoenix, AZ with his wife and two children.

 Rich generally shared his expertise with the NCCRT by analyzing our 2018 80% Partner Survey data, preparing the highlights report, and authoring this guest blog post.

In September 2018, the NCCRT released the fourth annual 80% Partner Survey to more than 1,800 NCCRT members and 80% Pledge partners. We received 240 completed surveys from a diverse group of organizations, including hospitals, community health centers, cancer centers, community organizations, nonprofits, academic institutions, and others. We are so grateful to our members and supporters who took the time to share both valuable feedback about NCCRT resources and about what is and what isn’t working as we continue towards our goal of 80% In Every Community.

The comprehensive overview of the survey results, which was shared with the Steering Committee during the NCCRT Annual Meeting on November 13, is available here. Please see below for key highlights.

Our partners were doing more to increase rates in 2018
Partner organizations were asked about the types of activities used to increase colorectal cancer screening rates (e.g., patient and public education, working with underserved communities, employers, and insurers). While previous results were already impressive, the 2018 results highlighted that our partners were doing more than ever to increase colorectal cancer screening rates. In fact, responding organizations reported doing more activities in 70% of the categories evaluated. What’s also impressive is that many organizations are planning to learn about and do even more activities in the coming months to increase screening rates!

We highlight successes, leaders, best practices, and tools that are making an impact in the nationwide movement to reach 80% screened for colorectal cancer.

Do you have a suggestion for a future blog topic? We welcome you to share your suggestions by emailing nccrt@cancer.org.

BLOG POLICY

Opinions expressed in these blog posts are that of the author and do not represent policies of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable or the author’s institution.

Our staff moderate all comments on the 80% Blog. While we do not censor based on point of view, we will delete or edit comments that are offensive or off topic. Click here to view full version.

These increased efforts have paid off!
Of the organizations that set goals to track, increase, and/or support a partner with increasing screening rates, 64% of organizations reported their colorectal cancer screening rate increased in the last year. This figure was up three percentage points from 2017.

Interventions work!
Survey responses included many examples of partner organizations implementing and adapting interventions to drive up colorectal screening rates in their communities. “Patient/member reminders and recall” and “Offering patients/members a choice of stool test or colonoscopy” topped the list of successful interventions. See below for the complete list.

NCCRT resources viewed as useful
A key component of the partner survey was to gather information on the awareness and usefulness of NCCRT’s resources (e.g., webinars, Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Health Plans, Evaluation Toolkit). Overall, NCCRT resources were viewed as useful by 97.6% of the partner organizations that used the resources. But there is work to be done around building awareness of the resources. Overall, 18.2% of responses did not know about the available resources.

Finally, I’d like to thank our colleagues at the American Cancer Society Statistics & Evaluation Center who programmed and conducted the survey, and again, thank you to NCCRT’s members and 80% by 2018 pledged partners who generously shared their time by completing the survey.

March 2018: Colorectal Cancer Awareness Goes Coast to Coast

April 5, 2018 :: Author: Author: Anjelica (“Anjee”) Davis and Richard Wender, MD

AnjeeDavisAnjelica (“Anjee”) Davis serves as President of Fight Colorectal Cancer, a national nonprofit founded in 2005. Ms. Davis co-chairs the NCCRT Public Awareness and Social Media Task Group and is a member of the steering committee.

 

RichardWenderDr. Richard Wender is the Chief Cancer Control Officer of the American Cancer Society and the Chair of the NCCRT.

 

 

To say we were excited about March 2018 would be an understatement. After all, the last four years of our 80% by 2018 effort have been an incredible journey. Building off our award-winning collaboration from March 2017, this year the NCCRT joined Fight Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society, with support from the Mayo Clinic, Exact Sciences, UPS, and others, to host Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast: Driving toward 80%. We decided to take our messages about the importance of screening on the road, and honestly, what creates more lasting memories than a great American road trip?

True to every great road trip, we made sure to travel to excellent destinations and to invite old and new friends to join us along the way. To really do this the right way – we of course needed a sweet ride.

Road Trip Requirement #1: Excellent Destinations

The NCCRT team made its way to Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Arizona; but the beauty of the effort was that events to promote colorectal cancer screening were taking place all around the country. We saw a wave of engagement from partners and colleagues wanting to ensure that March 2018 had the same energy and collaborative spirit that the 80% campaign has had from the beginning.


Partners across the nation were encouraged to submit their own local events to
populate the map above on the CRCCoast2Coast.org website.

From Anchorage, Alaska to Denver, Colorado, to Porter, Maine, the messages about colorectal cancer screening were shared coast to coast with creativity and passion. By the end of April, we’d marked 96 unique events that took place. Each destination was unique and the “stops” included a range of events:  watch parties, state proclamation signings, lobby days, press briefings, radio interviews, state roundtable meetings, shining blue lights on buildings, bridges and skylines, health fairs and more!

Buildings and neighborhoods in Denver, Colorado light up in blue

Picture 1 of 13

Stories and photos from these events keep pouring in. There are too many to post here, but we encourage you to check out the Twitter feed (hashtags #80by2018 and #CRCcoast2coast) to see what happened! If you hosted an event you’d like recognized, it’s not too late to post! To get it added to the map, email us the details and any photos. If you tweet about it and tag us (@NCCRTnews) we’ll be sure to share!

Road Trip Requirement #2: Friends, Old and New

We were energized to have survivors, celebrities, physicians, advocates, legislators, health professionals, and many others contribute time, stories, and passion to the cause.

LA Kick-off Event – March 8 The kick-off event took place on March 8th at Smashbox Studios in Los Angeles, where partners came together to share stories about hope, emphasize the importance of screening, celebrate our progress, and look to the road ahead. The event featured survivors, partners, experts, and celebrity guests who we interviewed on a “blue carpet.” Stage IV survivor Teri Griege gave us messages about hope and stage II survivor Thomas Lopez shared a personal story about his son; actor Luke Perry made a quick virtual appearance (and got photo bombed by KJ Apa of Riverdale, the TV show in which the two star); country singer and Fight CRC national spokesman Craig Campbell serenaded us with a song he wrote for survivors; Telemundo star Stephanie “Chiquibaby” Himonidis delivered screening messages in Spanish; CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson talked about the importance of reaching people where they are; Katie Couric teased her mystery man colonoscopy date; and we all cheered for the 2018 80% by 2018 National Achievement Award winners.

  Our messages about screening reached far more than those in attendance in Los Angeles. CRCCoast2Coast.org received over 2,300 website hits, the Blue Carpet pre-show and the CRC Coast to Coast live stream show gathered over 23,600 views and reached 69,500 people, collectively. The show was also shared far and wide by partners, such as Katie Couric, Stand Up to Cancer, National Alliance for Hispanic Health, the American College of Gastroenterology(ACG), Telemundo star Chiquibaby, and many others. Getty Images came out to take editorial photos, and Telemundo aired a series of spots about colorectal cancer and colon health, following the show. All combined, our web and social media presence reached more than 9.7 million people and generated more than 103.3 million impressions. If you missed the live show, you can still watch the recorded broadcast or view the short highlights video below. We know we’ll be turning back to it for inspiration throughout the rest of 2018! But the work didn’t stop after March 8. Friends kept our momentum going throughout the entire month. Business leaders rang the opening bell for NASDAQ; survivors gathered in Washington, D.C. for a lobby day and hill briefing; public health leaders put up yard signs and blue lights all throughout Denver, CO neighborhoods; FQHC staff hosted a watch party in Porter, Maine. We truly went coast to coast! Road Trip Requirement #3: The Sweet Ride Finally, no road trip would be complete without the sweetest of rides. In fitting fashion, UPS, one of the latest—and among the largest—organizations to make a commitment to working toward the 80% screening goal, offered to put our colorectal cancer screening messaging on the side of a UPS truck., The truck was showcased at the two signature events in LA and D.C. We know the journey to 80% by 2018 does not end after March, we will keep driving toward 80% well after this year is done.

  The Road Does Not End Here

Whether you celebrated with us in person, turned a city blue, or shared your own story of survivorship, your passion and dedication are making a difference and saving lives. We are grateful for you! Now, as our March 2018 travels become memories, we look ahead to the rest of 2018 rejuvenated and committed. Screening rates are going up; more than 150 health systems, clinics, and localities have reached 80%; hundreds more have seen their rates increase; and an additional 3.3 million more people were screened between 2014 and 2016. The progress we are making together is exciting; more and more organizations are joining this campaign by the day. And as Dr. Lisa Richardson reminded us during the Los Angeles broadcast, our work doesn’t end here. We’re not going to stop until all have a chance to benefit from the life-saving potential of screening. Let’s take this momentum and drive forward into the remainder of the year and beyond. Where will we be in March 2019? Live broadcasting from the moon? Let’s just say we’re not ruling it out…  

We highlight successes, leaders, best practices, and tools that are making an impact in the nationwide movement to reach 80% screened for colorectal cancer.

Do you have a suggestion for a future blog topic? We welcome you to share your suggestions by emailing nccrt@cancer.org.

BLOG POLICY

Opinions expressed in these blog posts are that of the author and do not represent policies of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable or the author’s institution.

Our staff moderate all comments on the 80% Blog. While we do not censor based on point of view, we will delete or edit comments that are offensive or off topic. Click here to view full version.

CRC News – Week of March 26, 2018

The following email news update was shared with NCCRT members and partners on Friday, March 30th, 2018. Sign up to subscribe to our regular email updates

Joint Katie Couric/Dak Prescott Column in Huffington Post

We thought you might find useful this joint column that appeared in the Huffington Post this week from Katie Couric and Dak Prescott talking about this importance of screening.   The piece mentions 80% by 2018 and the NCCRT.  And in case you missed it, the column includes a link to last week’s video of Jimmy Kimmel’s colonoscopy date with Katie Couric.  Please spread the word, as you see fit!

Special Report on CRC Screening from New England Journal of Medicine

The New England Journal of Medicine has published an article about the World Health Organization’s forthcoming handbook on colorectal cancer, IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Volume 17: Colorectal Cancer Screening. Among the worldwide experts asked to help write this authoritative handbook on the disease and the effectiveness of screening methods is our own NCCRT Co-Chair, Robert Smith, PhD, vice president, cancer screening for ACS. (The full handbook won’t be finalized and published for another six months).  We’re told the 80% by 2018 campaign is mentioned in the handbook.  Congratulations to Bob and the other authors!

Replay of Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast Hill Briefing

In case you missed it, you can watch a replay of last week’s Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast Hill Briefing.  (Go to the March 20th video).  The event featured several Members of Congress, race car driver and CRC survivor Scott Lagasse, and many NCCRT friends, including Lisa Richardson, Mark Pochapin, and Rich Wender.  Have a look to watch some inspiring talks about our work.  Congratulations to our friends at Fight CRC for putting on such a great event!

New CDC Blog on Colorectal Cancer Screening among Native Americans

American Indian and Alaska Native people get screened for colorectal cancer less often than the rest of the country. Find out how CDC is helping using innovative approaches, such as mailing FIT kits, in this new blog post by our CDC colleague Don Haverkamp.

New Blog from Public Health Matters on Colorectal Cancer Screening

Check out “7 Ways to Be Gutsy” on Public Health Matters, the blog from CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response.  The blog highlights seven practical steps that individuals can take to be healthy this March, Colorectal Cancer Awareness month.

Local NPR Story featuring 80% Pledger Shawnee Health Services

We’ve been thrilled with all the coverage we’ve seen about colorectal cancer this month!  This local NPR story on CRC Awareness month is a great example of the type of coverage we’ve collectively earned.  The story features American Cancer Society’s Caleb Nehring and Shawnee Health Service’s Nancy Caskey and Dr. Claire Williams talking about ongoing awareness efforts focused on colorectal cancer and our 80% goal. Many thanks to everyone who has successfully secured media coverage this March.

Registration is Open for the Dialogue for Action Meeting

Registration is now open for this year’s Dialogue for Action® on Cancer Screening and Prevention meeting, which will be held on April 11-13, 2018 at the Hilton McLean Tysons Corner in McLean, Va.  We have confirmed that the NCCRT will be hosting a workshop on Leveraging Hospital and Health Systems to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening during the preconference session on Wednesday, April 11th.  Additionally, both the NCCRT’s Community Health Center Task Group and the Public Awareness Task group will meet at 4:15 pm, also on Wednesday, April 11th.  Many thanks to our friends at the Prevent Cancer Foundation for generously sharing their meeting space with us.  Please contact caleb.levell@cancer.org if you are able to attend one of the Task Group meetings.

Registration is Open for the 4th Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit

The Colon Cancer Foundation and Northwell Health are sponsoring the 4th annual summit on Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer.  The theme of this year’s CME conference is “Why? What Factors Are Driving the Increasing Incidence of Young Adult Colorectal Cancer?”  The event will start April 26th 4:30 pm and conclude April 27th at 5:30 pm and is being held at the J.W. Essex House, 160 Central Park South, New York, NY 10019.  This event will bring together leading clinicians, scientists as well as early age onset (EAO) colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors and caregivers from across the country. The program will provide extensive opportunities for participants to advance their understanding of the rapidly increasing incidence of rectal and colon cancer among young adults under 50 years of age in the U.S. and abroad. To learn more and register, visit: http://www.coloncancerchallenge.org/about/eao-crc/

Enjoy the final few days of March, everyone!  Many thanks for the good work you do.

CRC News – Week of March 19, 2018

The following email news update was shared with NCCRT members and partners on Tuesday, March 20th, 2018. Sign up to subscribe to our regular email updates

Tune in Tonight! Katie Couric Takes Jimmy Kimmel for a Colonoscopy

Tune in tonight to watch Katie Couric on the Jimmy Kimmel Live Show – yes, Jimmy Kimmel is the mystery man that Katie took for a colonoscopy date!  Check this out:  https://twitter.com/katiecouric/status/976175278174040064

Do we even have to ask?  Repost and retweet on social media and on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter @KatieCouric.  And don’t skip the comments.  My favorite, “Thank you for spreading the word, while spreading your cheeks.”  Let’s have some fun with this!

Replay: CRC Screening Coast to Coast

From cobalt blue dresses to musical performances, the Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast: Driving toward 80% event, broadcast live from Los Angeles, was an awesome way to kick off the month of March.  In case you missed it, a replay of this informative awareness-raising event is available here to watch and share on Youtube.  Thank you to all our guests on the show, our wonderful 80% by 2018 award winners, and the many of you who united to make the day such a success, particularly Fight Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society, and our event partners, the Mayo Clinic, Exact Sciences, UPS and many others.  You can also view other stops on the Coast to Coast tour – enjoy these updates from Fight CRC’s hearing on Capitol Hill today: https://www.facebook.com/FightCRC/ or watch the ringing of the opening bell at NASDAQ.

How are We Doing?  Lots of New CDC Data Tell Us!

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the following new publications for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, which can help answer the question we hear all the time – how are we doing?

  • Colorectal Cancer: Quick Facts describes key findings and trends in the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) colorectal cancer screening data, including that the 2016 CRC screening rate is up to 67.3%, meaning an additional 3.3 million people were screened between 2014 and 2016https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/statistics/
  • An overview of the first year of the CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP), highlights that partner clinics saw a 4.4% CRC screening increase in just that first year: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/crccp/pdf/CRCCP_Year1_Summary-h.pdf   Thank you to Djenaba Joseph, Faye Wong and many others at CDC for their work on these new fact sheets!
  • CDC also shared a new study from the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention that gives county level estimates for CRC screening rates, which can estimate which counties have the lowest CRC screening rates and therefore, help guide interventions that could increase CRC screening rates in these areas.  View this press release to learn more.  Congratulations to NCCRT friend Marion Nadel, as well as the other authors!

HEDIS 2016 Rates Now Available

NCQA recently released the latest edition of the annual State of Health Care Quality Report  (http://www.ncqa.org/report-cards/health-plans/state-of-health-care-quality), in which health plans voluntarily disclose clinical quality, customer experience and resource use data, including CRC screening rates. The report showed progress on CRC screening rates for both Medicare and Commercial PPO plans in 2016, but not for HMO plans plan. View the 2016 rates and learn more: http://nccrt.org/hedis-2016/

NCCRT’s One-Stop-Shop on Data & Progress

Does all that data make you interested in learning more about national, state, and local level colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and screening rates? Visit NCCRT’s one-stop-shop, the Data & Progress webpage for useful charts and graphs on progress.

Postponed:  Colorectal Cancer Alliance Launch of “March Forth” in Philadelphia

With the expected winter storm tomorrow in Philadelphia, CCA has made the tough decision to postpone the March Forth prevention program launch, previously scheduled for tomorrow.  A new date will be announced in the next couple of days.  Stay safe and warm this week!

New Journal Articles

NCCRT Request for Proposals to Develop a Links of Care Training:

As was previously announced, the NCCRT has issued a request for proposals to develop a web based training that draws from the best practices and lessons learned from the NCCRT’s Links of Care model. The Links of Care pilots, launched in 2014, sought to strengthen the relationships between community health centers and the medical neighborhood in the delivery of colorectal cancer screening and follow up care. Our goal is to provide local communities with online access to the framework, advice, and tools and templates needed to develop a strong collaboration between health centers and specialty providers in order to improve the delivery of colorectal cancer screening and follow up care for patients in need. The deadline for proposals is April 6th, 2018

Please email Emily Bell, NCCRT Associate Director, (emily.butler@cancer.org) with any questions related to the RFP. We also welcome your suggestions for potential vendors. Email notification of intent to apply and questions regarding the proposal are due March 23rd, 2018. All questions and answers will be posted to this webpage: http://nccrt.org/rfp-loc

Registration is Open for the Dialogue for Action Meeting

Each year, the Dialogue for Action® on Cancer Screening and Prevention meeting brings together key stakeholders from clinical practice and public health programs to share effective strategies to improve cancer prevention and early detection.   Registration is now open for this year’s meeting, which will be held on April 11-13, 2018 at the Hilton McLean Tysons Corner in McLean, Va.  We have confirmed that the NCCRT will be hosting a workshop on Leveraging Hospital and Health Systems to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening during the preconference session on Wednesday, April 11th.  Additionally, both the NCCRT’s Community Health Center Task Group and the Public Awareness Task group will meet at 4:15 pm, also on Wednesday, April 11th.  Many thanks to our friends at the Prevent Cancer Foundation for generously sharing their meeting space with us.  Please contact caleb.levell@cancer.org if you are able to attend one of the Task Group meetings.

Registration is Open for the 4th Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit

The Colon Cancer Foundation and Northwell Health are sponsoring the 4th annual summit on Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer.  The theme of this year’s CME conference is “Why? What Factors Are Driving the Increasing Incidence of Young Adult Colorectal Cancer?”  The event will start April 26th 4:30 pm and conclude April 27th at 5:30 pm and is being held at the J.W. Essex House, 160 Central Park South, New York, NY 10019.  This event will bring together leading clinicians, scientists as well as early age onset (EAO) colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors and caregivers from across the country. The program will provide extensive opportunities for participants to advance their understanding of the rapidly increasing incidence of rectal and colon cancer among young adults under 50 years of age in the U.S. and abroad. To learn more and register, visit: http://www.coloncancerchallenge.org/about/eao-crc/

Enjoy the rest of March, everyone!  Many thanks for the good work you do.

CRC News – Week of March 5, 2018

The following email news update was shared with NCCRT members and partners on Wednesday, March 7th, 2018. Sign up to subscribe to our regular email updates

We hope your March is off to a great start!  There is a lot to share about our favorite month.

Tomorrow:  Watch CRC Screening Coast to Coast on Facebook Live

We hope you will be able to watch our Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast broadcast from Los Angeles tomorrow, March 8th, as we kick off March Colorectal Cancer Awareness month!  We’ll start streaming from the Blue Carpet at 1:00pm Pacific/4:00pm ET, which you can watch on Mayo’s Facebook page.  The Coast to Coast Celebrity and Survivor discussion will start at 1:30pm Pacific/4:30pm ET, available through Facebook Live on the American Cancer Society, NCCRT, Fight CRC or Mayo Clinic Facebook pages.  Many thanks to our friends at AGA, ACG and the National Alliance for Hispanic Health who will be sharing the show on their facebook pages.  We hope others can as well!  Read last week’s blog for more information on how to watch, share, and support the effort!  #80by2018  #CRCcoast2coast

New 80% by 2018 Blog Featuring Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, 80% by 2018 National Achievement Award Winner

A new 80% by 2018 blog is posted, featuring the 80% by 2018 National Achievement award grand prize winner, Oklahoma City Indian Clinic.  Read about their incredible work increasing screening rates from 14% to 64%, even as their patient base surged! Congratulations again to OKCIC, and many thanks to Kelli Guinn and Jessica Deaton of OKCIC for spending time with us to share how they achieved success.  If you or your colleagues would like to share the blog on social media, you are welcome to use our shortened URL (http://ow.ly/WL2dI) and/or to retweet/repost the messages we are sharing through @NCCRTnews and facebook.com/coloncancerroundtable.

New PSA from Katie Couric

Many of you may enjoy Katie Couric’s new PSA.  We know Katie welcomes your use and sharing of the PSA to spread the word!  NCCRT Member organizations that are non-profits are invited to co-brand the video.  Please contact Jane Rubinstein with questions at jrubinstein@su2c.org.  Also, follow Katie’s outreach efforts on colorectal cancer screening this month on Instagram and Twitter @KatieCouric.

New CDC Screen for Life PSA Videos

New Screen for Life PSAs use animation to encourage men and women 50+ to get screened for colorectal cancer.  Titled “Community Garden,” the PSAs are available in English and Spanish. Check out their website to view these very informative PSAs!

White House Declares March National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

I’m pleased to share that the White House has declared this March, National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.  Many thanks to the many NCCRT Members that reached out to the White House earlier in the year to ensure this was a priority.  Additional thanks to Kathleen Lobb of EIF’s Stand Up To Cancer for bringing this to our attention.

American Cancer Society Social Media Campaign #ShareYourScreen

The ACS North East Region is launching a #ShareYourScreen social media campaign for March.  From the name, you may think you are being asked to post a photo of your colonoscopy. You are not. You are being asked to share something a bit easier, but equally intriguing: a screenshot of your phone’s lock screen.  Here are the instructions to participate:

  1. Take a screenshot of your smartphone lock screen. To do so, hold down the home and top or side buttons for most iPhones, or hold down the home and power button for most Androids.
  2. Post the screenshot as a photo to Facebook, Twitter or Instagram along with the following message: “I’m sharing my screen to help the @AmericanCancerSociety raise awareness of colon cancer screening. If you’re 50 or older, get screened! Now, I challenge you to #ShareYourScreen to keep this message going!”
  3. Tag up to three friends in the post, challenging each of them to #ShareYourScreen.

Please contact Ashley.engelman@cancer.org with questions.

New Resource on Do’s and Don’t of CRC Screening

Many thanks to the Georgia Colorectal Cancer Roundtable and their many partners for creating this new resource, The Dos and Don’ts of Colorectal Cancer Screening.  In addition to ACS, the flier has been endorsed by the Georgia Association of Family Physicians, the Georgia Chapter of the American College of Physicians, the Georgia Primary Care Association, and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable.  Additional thanks to the Medical Association of Georgia for their work promoting the resource, including making it available on Twitter (@MAG1849).  Thank you to Kelly Durden for bringing the final product to our attention!

New Position Posted: Colorectal Cancer Alliance Medical Affairs Director

Our friends at CCA asked us to spread the word that they are looking to hire DC-based Medical Affairs Director.  Feel free to spread the word.  See this post for more details and contact CCA for more information.

CDC’s Preventing Chronic Disease 2018 Student Research Paper Contest Deadline

CDC’s Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) is currently taking submissions for its 2018 Student Research Paper Contest.  High school, undergraduate and graduate students, and medical residency and recent postdoctoral fellows are invited to submit work relevant to the prevention, screening, surveillance, and/or population-based intervention of chronic diseases, including but not limited to arthritis, asthma, cancer, depression, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Papers must be received electronically no later than 5:00 PM EST on March 23, 2018.  Additional information and detailed submission and eligibility guidelines are available on the PCD website.

NCCRT Request for Proposals to Develop a Links of Care Training:

As was previously announced, the NCCRT has issued a request for proposals to develop a web based training that draws from the best practices and lessons learned from the NCCRT’s Links of Care model. The Links of Care pilots, launched in 2014, sought to strengthen the relationships between community health centers and the medical neighborhood in the delivery of colorectal cancer screening and follow up care. Our goal is to provide local communities with online access to the framework, advice, and tools and templates needed to develop a strong collaboration between health centers and specialty providers in order to improve the delivery of colorectal cancer screening and follow up care for patients in need. The deadline for proposals is April 6th, 2018

Please email Emily Bell, NCCRT Associate Director, (emily.butler@cancer.org) with any questions related to the RFP. We also welcome your suggestions for potential vendors. Email notification of intent to apply and questions regarding the proposal are due March 23rd, 2018. All questions and answers will be posted to this webpage: http://nccrt.org/rfp-loc

Registration is Open for the Dialogue for Action Meeting

Each year, the Dialogue for Action® on Cancer Screening and Prevention meeting brings together key stakeholders from clinical practice and public health programs to share effective strategies to improve cancer prevention and early detection.   Registration is now open for this year’s meeting, which will be held on April 11-13, 2018 at the Hilton McLean Tysons Corner in McLean, Va.  We have confirmed that the NCCRT will be hosting a workshop on Leveraging Hospital and Health Systems to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening during the preconference session on Wednesday, April 11th.  Additionally, both the NCCRT’s Community Health Center Task Group and the Public Awareness Task group will meet at 4:15 pm, also on Wednesday, April 11th.  Many thanks to our friends at the Prevent Cancer Foundation for generously sharing their meeting space with us.  Please contact caleb.levell@cancer.org if you are able to attend one of the Task Group meetings.

Have a great March, everyone!  Many thanks for the good work you do.

Interview with Oklahoma City Indian Clinic—Grand Prize Recipient of the 2018 80% by 2018 National Achievement Award

March 6, 2018 – Author: Kelli Guinn, DON, RN, BSN & Jessica Deaton, Care Manager, RN, BSN

Kelli Guinn and Jessica Deaton
Kelli Guinn and Jessica Deaton

On February 26, 2018, Oklahoma City Indian Clinic (OKCIC) became the Grand Prize recipient of the 2018 80% by 2018 National Achievement Awards, a program designed to recognize individuals and organizations who are dedicating their time, talent and expertise to advancing needed initiatives that support the shared goal to regularly screen 80% of adults 50 and over.

Kelli Guinn, DON, RN, BSN is a proud member of the Chickasaw Nation tribe with over 11 years of nursing experience in working with underprivileged populations. She currently works as the Director of Nursing at the OKCIC. She graduated with her Bachelors in the Science of Nursing from Langston University, in 2006. She has been collaborating with the American Cancer Society on several projects which are centered on cancer prevention and improving patient outcomes since 2014. 

Jessica Deaton, RN, BSN has six years of nursing experience. She graduated with her Bachelors in the Science of Nursing in 2011 from the University of Oklahoma. She has an extensive background in cardiac care, then went on to work as an RN Care Manager at OKCIC. In 2016, she helped develop and coordinate a colorectal cancer screening program while continuing to work towards increasing colorectal cancer screening rates. She has presented on a webinar for the NCCRT about colorectal cancer screening in the American Indian population as well as presented an abstract at the American Nurses Association Conference on quality improvement.  

Hi, Kelli and Jessica! We’re excited to feature your work on the 80% by 2018 Blog. Can you tell us a little about yourself and how you ended up working on colorectal cancer screening?
First and foremost, we are so honored and humbled to have been chosen as the 2018 Grand Prize recipient of the 2018 80% by 2018 National Achievement Award. It has been a long and rewarding adventure to say the least. Colorectal cancer screening has always been an important focus to our clinic including our CEO having a personal connection, which has been an influential driving force and support system.

[Kelli] I started at the Oklahoma City Indian Clinic (OKCIC) in 2014 and was one of the founding members of the internal Colorectal Cancer Quality Improvement Committee (CRC QI). As the Director of Nursing, I have been a longstanding advocate for improving cancer screening rates, removing patient barriers, and am passionate about leading my nursing staff efficiently to provide compassionate quality care to all patients.

[Jessica] I started at the OKCIC in 2015 as an RN Care Manager. At the beginning of 2016, I accepted the assignment of spearheading a grant application for colorectal cancer funding. This opportunity led me to research evidence-based practice that could be implemented and utilized to further increase colorectal screening rates at the OKCIC. Shortly after, I began to chair the CRC QI Committee, which led to being accepted as members of the NCCRT as well as signing the 80% Pledge.

Tell us a little bit about Oklahoma City Indian Clinic.
Oklahoma City Indian Clinic (OKCIC) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit clinic that provides services to nearly 20,000 American Indians in central Oklahoma from over 200 federally recognized tribes every year. We have implemented many practice changes to increase colorectal cancer screening rates. We are small but mighty in the sense that we attempt to offer a comprehensive visit during each patient encounter. We accomplish this by offering a variety of onsite services in addition to primary care which include: CT and other radiology services, mammography, laboratory services, behavioral health, public heath to include cancer navigation, onsite pharmacy, along with multiple other services. We continue to grow and expand services in order to meet the needs of our patients while adapting treatment plans based on disparities in order to provide holistic care. We are currently discussing potential implementation of internally screening patients earlier than the recommended age of 50 due to the high incidence of colorectal cancer and increased mortality rates within the American Indian population.

In addition to improving screening rates, we also screen each patient for insurance during the registration process. All of our Patient Relations Representatives interview each patient to identify eligibility for alternate resources. We are currently exploring the possibility of starting an Insurance Sponsorship program for selected patients to pay insurance premiums and provide a marketplace Blue Cross Blue Shield plan. These steps aid in reducing patient transportation barriers, since being insured means that patients can complete colorectal cancer screening and diagnostic testing locally rather than traveling to another Indian Health Services (IHS) facility (approximately a three-hour round trip).

OKCICclinic

What activities and systems changes did you implement, and how did you choose them?
A defining moment that ultimately led to our process changes was when we began our colorectal cancer partnership with the American Cancer Society (ACS). Our ACS Primary Care Health Systems Manager, Meagan Carter, was our educator and biggest advocate. She introduced us to the holy grail of colorectal cancer screening, Steps for Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates: A Manual for Community Health Centers. Armed with this tool, we implemented initiatives that affected change and created sustaining processes that could be seen through data. Activities included forming a quality improvement committee that meets quarterly to analyze and review evidence-based practices and current initiatives, systematizing patient and provider reminders, improving tracking in the electronic health record, offering incentives for completing screening at health fairs, creating an oncology case manager position within public health to provide navigation to patients and eliminating gaps in care, and improving access to screenings by offering a Flu-FIT (fecal immunochemical test) clinic in the fall. As a result, OKCIC has increased colorectal cancer screening rates among age-eligible patients from 14% in 2007 to 64% in 2017, while patient volume increased by 27%. The chart below illustrates our yearly screening rates as compared to OKCIC’s screening goal and the area target, the goal for Oklahoma as a state.

OKCICchart

I understand you took a multidisciplinary approach to provide patients with a FIT test. How did this work?
Although most of the colorectal cancer screening efforts are nursing driven, OKCIC has multi-departmental supporting strategies which are evidence-based and aid in cultivating a medical home atmosphere. A recent notable endeavor was when the pharmacy department collaborated efforts to increase colorectal cancer screening rates. In just three months, screening rates increased by approximately five percentage points by the additional assistance from the dedicated pharmacy team. This further demonstrates the large impact that the clinic has had on screening rates throughout the surrounding Oklahoma City area.

Our cancer screening initiatives also led us to identify a need for one-on-one cancer navigation. In December 2016, OKCIC started providing specialized patient navigation to all oncology patients, including patients with colorectal cancer. There are now over 200 patients in the OKCIC Oncology Patient Registry, of which about 10% have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The Oncology Case Manager works diligently to obtain medical records, place referrals, and follow up on comprehensive health care needs. Colorectal cancer treatment can often be complicated and time-sensitive. The Oncology Case Manager insures that patients receive personalized one-one-one education, navigation through the complex treatment process, and approval for their referrals to be paid through the IHS’s Purchased and Referred Care budget.

Without this service, many patients would be overwhelmed and lost to follow up in the complicated health care system or due to the financial burden of treatment. The ability to offer Oncology Case Management Care as well as managing an Oncology Patient Registry makes OKCIC unique in Indian Country, which further contributes to 80% by 2018 attainment and being the national model for American Indian health care.

What success have you seen? How did you measure that success?
In addition to seeing our internal screening rate increase from 14% in 2007 to 64% in 2017, we’ve seen many other notable successes. Colorectal cancer screening has become an expected screening for our age-eligible patients over the past three years. We have noticed an increase in patients requesting FIT kit screening when interacting with different clinic departments. Every March we conduct a FIT kit competition amongst all nursing and provider staff. This healthy competition has created buy-in and in return the nurse with the most returned FIT kits is personally recognized during the annual 5K Strollin’ Colon Run in Oklahoma City and is given free admission to the event.  Lastly, we consider being invited to speak on one of the NCCRT webinars along with being selected as the Grand Prize winner of the 2018 80% by 2018 National Achievement Award to be a major success.

OKCICstaff

Were there tools, trainings or resources that you found helpful?
The relationship that was formed with the ACS was one of our biggest resources that we utilized to develop a sound process map. Along with this relationship, the “CRC News” emails sent out by the NCCRT that provide webinar trainings along with scholarly articles featuring colorectal cancer screening initiatives, and attending the 2016 NCCRT Annual Meeting were a huge asset to our screening success. We were also fortunate to receive one-on-one provider training on how to improve colorectal cancer screening rates and quality with the famously helpful Durado Brooks, MD, MPH, which also helped improve provider buy-in, at the same time igniting passion for improving screening rates.

Other evidence-based interventions that have been implemented include small media, provider assessment and feedback, and client and provider reminder and recall systems. We would encourage all individuals aiming to increase their facility’s colorectal cancer screening rates to tune into NCCRT’s webinars and take the time to read and utilize the scholarly articles in efforts to modify and improve your current process. We have watched many NCCRT webinars ourselves; however, the two that have been most influential are the October 2017 80% by 2018 Progress webinar that featured Dr. Richard Wender, Chair of the NCCRT, and the July 2016 webinar on colorectal cancer screening and the Patient Centered Medical Home.

Do you have any final tips for our readers that are working to achieve 80% by 2018?
Keep striving to succeed! We have been able to affect change and save lives without grant funding in our small partially federally funded facility. If we can achieve increases in colorectal cancer screening rates, any facility can make effective changes and see sustained results as long as they remain dedicated. While our goal is to reach 80% of patients screened by 2018, we know that any increase in completed screenings are ultimately saving the lives of our patients and at the end of the day this is what is important and what matters the most!

Thank you for sharing your story with us! We look forward to hearing more about your work and Oklahoma City Indian Clinic’s progress in the future.

OKCIC-logo
Edited_Colon cancer photo booth_029_preview

We highlight successes, leaders, best practices, and tools that are making an impact in the nationwide movement to reach 80% screened for colorectal cancer.

Do you have a suggestion for a future blog topic? We welcome you to share your suggestions by emailing nccrt@cancer.org.

BLOG POLICY

Opinions expressed in these blog posts are that of the author and do not represent policies of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable or the author’s institution.

Our staff moderate all comments on the 80% Blog. While we do not censor based on point of view, we will delete or edit comments that are offensive or off topic. Click here to view full version.

CRC News – Week of February 26, 2018

The following email news update was shared with NCCRT members and partners on Tuesday, February 27th, 2018. Sign up to subscribe to our regular email updates

This week marks the start of March, Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and we have lots of news to share.

Congratulations To The 2018 80% By 2018 National Achievement Award Winners!

The NCCRT has recognized seven organizations with the 2018 80% by 2018 National Achievement Award, a prestigious national honor recognizing leadership in the ongoing effort to increase colorectal cancer screening rates across the United States. This year’s recipients include Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, Oklahoma City, OK, as the grand prize winner; and other honorees include AltaMed Health Services, Los Angeles, CA; Ameren, St. Louis, MO; Ohio Academy of Family Physicians, Columbus, OH; Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Samuel C. Pace, M.D., Tupelo, MS; and the Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, Lincoln, NE. We are honored to recognize these extraordinary awardees for their dedication and efforts to increase colorectal cancer screening.

Learn more about these organizations’ exemplary work to increase colorectal cancer screening: http://nccrt.org/2018-80-2018-national-achievement-awards/

View and share the joint American Cancer Society/NCCRT press release: http://pressroom.cancer.org/80x2018awards

New 80% by 2018 Blog:  Joining in the CRC Screening Coast to Coast Effort

We have a new 80% by 2018 blog posted that’s a call to action for watching and supporting our Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast efforts!  Please give it a read, and share with your partners.  We need everyone’s help promoting the March 8th show, touting your own March activity (and getting it added to the Coast to Coast map, created by our friends at Fight CRC), and spreading the word about how to make the most out of this March.  This blog tells you exactly how to participate.

If you or your colleagues would like to share the blog on social media, you are welcome to use our shortened URL (http://ow.ly/WL2dI) and/or to retweet/repost the messages we are sharing through @NCCRTnews and facebook.com/coloncancerroundtable.

Save the Date – 2018 NCCRT Annual Meeting, Nov. 14th – Nov. 16th, 2018 in Baltimore, MD

NCCRT Members: Mark your calendars – the 2018 NCCRT Annual Meeting will start with pre-conference activity, including late afternoon Task Group meetings, on Wednesday, Nov. 14th and close the afternoon of Friday, November 16th.  Also note – we’re moving!  The meeting will be held in Baltimore, MD this year.  Thanks to those of you who have already asked about meeting sponsorship opportunities, which are now open.  Visit this link for more information.

Replay NCCRT Webinar on Increasing CRC Screening Among the Underserved Now Available

In case you missed it, the replay of the Feb. 20th, webinar, Increasing CRC Screening Among the Underserved, can be found here: http://nccrt.org/resource/innovative-ways-increase-colorectal-cancer-screening-among-underserved-february-20-2018/  Slides are also available at the link.  Many thanks to our fantastic speakers, Drs. Joe Ravenell, Karen Kim and Jenna Hatcher!

NCCRT Request for Proposals to Develop a Links of Care Training:

As was previously announced, the NCCRT has issued a request for proposals to develop a web based training that draws from the best practices and lessons learned from the NCCRT’s Links of Care model. The Links of Care pilots, launched in 2014, sought to strengthen the relationships between community health centers and the medical neighborhood in the delivery of colorectal cancer screening and follow up care. Our goal is to provide local communities with online access to the framework, advice, and tools and templates needed to develop a strong collaboration between health centers and specialty providers in order to improve the delivery of colorectal cancer screening and follow up care for patients in need. The deadline for proposals is April 6th, 2018

Please email Emily Bell, NCCRT Associate Director, (emily.butler@cancer.org) with any questions related to the RFP. We also welcome your suggestions for potential vendors. Email notification of intent to apply and questions regarding the proposal are due March 23rd, 2018. All questions and answers will be posted to this webpage: http://nccrt.org/rfp-loc

Fill out a “Stat Madness” Bracket to Recognize 2017 Groundbreaking Research on Early Onset CRC:

Many of you will recall the groundbreaking research study led by NCCRT friend and American Cancer Society researcher, Rebecca Siegel, last year, which found that compared to people born around 1950, people born around 1990 have twice the risk of getting colon cancer, and four times the risk of getting rectal cancer.  You can vote for this research in the bracket-style competition Stat Madness, a celebration of science that highlights significant research in biomedical science from the past year.  Help us bring more attention to this important research by voting for this ACS study, currently pitted against Yale University in the first round (sorry Dr. Llor!).  The first round bracket is up and can be filled out here.

Dress in Blue Day is this Friday, March 2nd, 2018

Dress in Blue Day is Friday, March 2, 2018.  Our friends at the Colorectal Cancer Alliance have asked that we spread the word that by wearing blue on Friday, you and your peers become part of a nation of passionate allies, taking on this senseless killer.  You can also enter their photo contest with your bluest swag and any pets, props, beads and more to snap the perfect shot!  Grand Prize: The photo with the most votes at the end of the month won a free inflatable colon rental, to arrive at the event/location of your choosing within the continental United States.  The Colorectal Cancer Alliance also has updated free materials for download on family history, colonoscopy prep, symptom tracking, etc. in English and Spanish, accessed via this link.  Please contact Patrice Brown at pbrown@ccalliance.org with any questions.

ICYMI: Beyond 2018 FAQs and Changes to the 80% by 2018 Pledge

Wondering what happens after 80% by 2018? Read the “Beyond 2018 FAQs” to learn how NCCRT is charting the course for our work to increase colorectal screening beyond 2018, including how the 80% by 2018 pledge has recently been changed to the 80% Pledge to reflect our intention to continue our efforts to increase colorectal cancer screening to 80% or higher across the nation beyond 2018.

Have You Hit 80%?

It’s been rewarding to see the reports of partners who have hit their 80% goal in 2018 start to trickle in.  If you are one of them – be sure to submit your achievement to the 80% by 2018 Hall of Fame for recognition.

Have a great March, everyone!  Many thanks for the good work you do.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast! Join in!

February 22, 2018 – Author: Mary Doroshenk, MA

2017_dec_nccrt_414--crop

It’s almost March of 2018! National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, is always an exciting time as we make the most of our time in the national spotlight, but 2018 is an especially big year for us. We’ve some great plans in place, and we know you do too. We need everyone’s help promoting these events, so we can amplify our collective voice.

On Thursday, March 8th, the NCCRT will be co-hosting a live broadcast from the “Blue Carpet” in Los Angeles to celebrate the start of March. The theme this March is Colorectal Cancer Screening Coast to Coast: Driving to 80%. Streaming from the “Blue Carpet” will start at 4:00pm EST/1:00pm Pacific; our Coast to Coast Celebrity and Survivor Discussions will start at 4:30pm ET/1:30pm Pacific. We are partnering with Fight Colorectal Cancer, the American Cancer Society, the Mayo Clinic, Exact Sciences, UPS, and others to leverage the voices of celebrities, survivors, and experts to educate people about colorectal cancer and the life-saving importance of screening.

2018_Coast2Coast_LAEvent

We highlight successes, leaders, best practices, and tools that are making an impact in the nationwide movement to reach 80% screened for colorectal cancer.

Do you have a suggestion for a future blog topic? We welcome you to share your suggestions by emailing nccrt@cancer.org.

BLOG POLICY

Opinions expressed in these blog posts are that of the author and do not represent policies of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable or the author’s institution.

Our staff moderate all comments on the 80% Blog. While we do not censor based on point of view, we will delete or edit comments that are offensive or off topic. Click here to view full version.

How can you be a part of CRCCoast2Coast?

  • If you are in the Los Angeles area, register by February 26th to join us! Space is limited.
  • Not going to be in LA? You can watch the events through Facebook Live on the American Cancer Society, NCCRT, Fight CRC or Mayo Clinic Facebook pages. Be sure to “like” the pages in advance so you get event notifications the day of. You could even plan to host a watch party! Post pictures and videos on Twitter or Instagram using #80by2018 or #CRCcoast2coast. Finally, the more you like, comment or share both the Blue Carpet stream and the Coast to Coast show on Facebook, the more they will appear on people’s feeds. We’d love your help! Visit the website to learn more and for updates.
  • Those of you in the DC area can join us later in the month on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on March 20th as Fight CRC, ACS CAN and the NCCRT map out the road to 80% screened and beyond from Capitol Hill! (Part of Fight Colorectal Cancer’s Call-on Congress.) Register to join us.

Tell Us What You Are Doing this March
We want to feature your events that are helping to advance screening or raise awareness throughout the month of March!

  • Are you hosting an awareness event, gathering partners for a roundtable meeting or turning your city blue? Let us know! We’ll add you to our map below.
  • Post pictures and videos from the screening events and promotions you host on social media. Post on Twitter or Instagram using #80by2018 or #CRCcoast2coast
  • Share a :30 second video about your 80% by 2018 successes on YouTube. Email the link to NCCRT@cancer.org with “80% by 2018 Success” in the subject line. View this video from the OSU PACE program, featuring Dr. Darrell Gray as an example.

Spread Awareness through Social Media
Cast your colorectal cancer screening messages far and wide with this guidance on promoting screening via social media:

We look forward to celebrating and spreading awareness with you this March!

Mary Doroshenk, MA
Director, NCCRT
Strategic Director, Colorectal Cancer Intervention
American Cancer Society, Inc.