NCCRT Learning Center

The NCCRT Learning Center is a digital learning platform which features courses, tools, and other resources on colorectal cancer screening delivery and research. Current educational offerings include:

  • The Colonoscopy Needs Calculator—This tool estimates the number of colonoscopies your practice can realistically anticipate with a high-quality stool-based colorectal cancer screening program based on various screening rate goals and other data inputs. It also provides an estimation of what the total colonoscopy need would cost a system as well as a comparison between the costs of treating cancer and costs of providing colonoscopies.
  • The Communications Education Portal—This course houses our suite of market research findings on the unscreened for colorectal cancer and messaging recommendations to more effectively develop communication campaigns and resources for unscreened populations. Learners can peruse the market research findings from start to finish or jump in to find just what you need to educate, empower, and mobilize those who are not getting screened for colorectal cancer.

We plan to populate the NCCRT Learning Center with additional tools and learning modules over time. Users can create an account to track your progress, learn when new content is released, and access more courses as they become available.

 

Continuing Education Courses for Healthcare Providers on Colorectal Cancer Screening

To provide up-to-date information on recommended best practices for colorectal cancer screening, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partnered with Medscape Education to create two continuing education courses for healthcare providers.

In one of these courses, Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Recommended Best Practices (0.5 CME/CNE credits), David Lieberman, MD, of Oregon Health and Science University, leads a video lecture that explains why colorectal cancer screening is important, how to determine the timing and frequency of colorectal cancer screening, recommended stool-based and direct visualization screening strategies, and how to improve screening quality with a programmatic approach and quality metrics.

The second course, CRC Screening and Surveillance: Optimizing Quality (1.0 CME/CNE credits), is a three-part clinical anthology that includes more detail on these topics and explains the role of primary care providers in stool testing and colonoscopy programs.

These free courses are available for continuing education credit. You can create a free Medscape account and view the courses at: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/946291  and https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/945988.

Evaluation: The courses were developed by nationally recognized experts in colorectal cancer screening, including primary care clinicians, gastroenterologists, and epidemiologists.

Permissions: Made publicly available online through Medscape Education.

Publication date: March 15 and 24, 2021.

Post date: March 31, 2021.

Contact: Submit comments, questions, and suggestions via the links on the Medscape Education website. 

My CT Colonography Center Locator Tool

The American College of Radiology (ACR) is now offering the My CT Colonography Center online locator, a patient-friendly online tool to find a computed tomography (CT) colonography screening center near you.

Bracco Diagnostics, Inc. originally developed the tool, which includes 120 centers – only a portion of the more than 700 estimated centers that perform CT Colonography (CTC). The ACR will now work with stakeholders to explore ways to achieve the goal of having all facilities that perform CTC registered on a center locator. To date, there are 220 centers registered for the locator tool.

The webpage also includes patient brochures on CTC, a video of a patient receiving a CTC, and more.

Evaluation: This tool was developed as a collaborative effort with Bracco Diagnostic and ACR CTC registry participants discussing a need to increase awareness of CTC screening option for patients.


Permissions:
 Made publicly available online by the American College of Radiology.


Publication date: 
September 2019


Post date: 
April 20, 2020


Contact:
Submit comments, questions, and suggestions info@acr.org.

The Dos and Don’ts of Colorectal Cancer Screening

This one-page flyer may be used to remind clinicians about some of the dos and don’ts when it comes to colorectal cancer screening.

Partners may have the option to cobrand the flyer with their organization’s logo. Contact your local American Cancer Society to learn more.

80% in Every Community 2019 Messaging Guidebook: Recommended Messages to Reaching the Unscreened – July 16, 2019

This webinar provided an introduction to the 2019 80% in Every Community Messaging Guidebook: Recommended messages to reach the unscreened. The guidebook serves as a resource to both better understand the motivations, attitudes, and barriers of key unscreened populations, while it also recommends market tested messages that can educate and motivate these key audiences on the importance of colorectal cancer screening. The 2019 update to this NCCRT resource includes new findings, new population profiles, and message delivery insights that will better inform our efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% in Every Community. 

Speakers:

  • Michelle Aubertine, KS&R
  • Bill Willard, American Cancer Society

 

Penn State Health Electronic Employee Survey

Physician researchers at Penn State Health developed this colorectal cancer screening uptake and risk assessment tool for use by large entities such as employers and medical practices. The survey tool assesses whether an employee is up to date with screening based on 2016 USPSTF guidelines and also includes a risk assessment checklist to determine if the individual is at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

Penn State Health administered the survey to 6,188 employees, with a response rate of 45%. For respondents ≥50 years, 81% reported up-to-date colorectal cancer screening; thirty-three percent of all participants self-identified as high-risk.

Large employers are encouraged to adapt the survey tool and introduction letter for use with their employees.

Evaluation: The survey was administered electronically to all Penn State Health employees ≥40 years via an online platform. The survey anonymously collected demographic data. Associations between demographic/ risk factors and up-to-date screening status were examined using Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables and Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test for quantitative variables.

Permissions: These tools can be used by any large employer to measure their colorectal cancer screening rates.

Publication date: July 2018

Post date: December 18, 2018

Contact: Send comments, questions, and suggestions to Thomas McGarrity, MD at tmcgarrity@pennstatehealth.psu.edu.

Cancer Center Summit:  A Strategic Look at Cancer Centers and Colorectal Cancer Screening – October 2, 2017

On October 2nd, 2017, in Washington, DC, the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) hosted a Cancer Center Summit: A Strategic Look at Cancer Centers and Colorectal Cancer Screening. The purpose of the meeting was to convene representatives from key national and local organizations, including leaders from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and several NCI-designated cancer centers to explore how to leverage the expertise and community presence of cancer centers in the effort to increase CRC screening rates.  The meeting sought to understand cancer center barriers to focusing on CRC screening as a priority issue; identify strategies to overcome barriers so that cancer centers can leverage their role in the community to achieve higher CRC screening rates; and begin the process of developing a strategic plan to spur cancer center action in this area.  The summary meeting report, which includes case studies of NCI-designated Cancer Centers that excel in advancing CRC screening efforts, is attached. 

This report was only made possible by the work of numerous individuals. Many thanks to the meeting co-chairs, Robert Croyle, Richard Wender, and Lisa Richardson, for their leadership and guidance; to the meeting presenters/facilitators, Ernest Hawk, Electra Paskett, Karen Kim, Robin Vanderpool, Ronald Myers, Lynn Butterly, Caleb Levell, Mary Doroshenk, Katie Bathje, Ken Lin Tai, Suzanne Lagarde, Holly Guerrero, LeeAnn Bailey, Cindy Vinson, Sarah Shafir, and Michael Potter, who each reviewed their individual sections for accuracy; and to Michael Potter, Dorothy Lane, Electra Paskett, Ernest Hawk, and Todd Lucas for their review and edit of the full report.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices For Hospitals And Health Systems – July 18, 2018

This webinar hosted on Wednesday, July 18 announced the release of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Hospitals and Health SystemsThe purpose of the webinar was to familiarize participants with the new handbook, review critical steps for hospitals and health systems to take in advancing colorectal cancer screening efforts, and learn from two health system leaders about their experiences implementing colorectal cancer screening interventions, as featured in the handbook. This webinar was patterned after a workshop on the topic featured at the 2017 NCCRT Annual Meeting.

Speakers include: 

  • Mary Doroshenk, Director, NCCRT
  • Andrew Albert, MD, MPH, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center
  • Amanda Bohleber, MD, Medical Director, Deaconess Clinic

The webinar was moderated by the Co-Chairs of the NCCRT Professional Education and Practice Implementation Task Group, Michael Potter, MD, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Lane, MD, MPH, American College of Preventive Medicine.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices: A Handbook for Hospitals and Health Systems

The purpose of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices: A Handbook for Hospitals and Health Systems is to provide advice on the design and delivery of a variety of effective CRC screening interventions to help all hospitals and health systems strengthen their colorectal cancer screening efforts.  With their expertise in both improving health and in serving as leaders in their communities, hospitals and health systems are uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in increasing colorectal cancer screening for those they serve.  The handbook is divided into four sections:  Critical Steps, Case Studies, Implementation, and Tools & Resources. It is intended to provide you with needed information drawn from real life examples about how to ultimately improve CRC screening rates within the hospital and health system setting.

A corresponding webinar was held in July 2018 announcing the release of the handbook and included presentations from two health systems featured in the guide. View the Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices for Hospitals and Health Systems webinar.

Many thanks to the hospitals and health systems featured in the guide for sharing their time and their tremendous expertise, as well as to handbook’s expert advisory group, which was chaired by Drs. Michael Potter and Dorothy Lane, Co-Chairs of the NCCRT Professional Education and Practice Implementation Task Group.

This handbook is dedicated to the memory of Marie LaFargue.

Links Of Care Update

Links of Care Update – July 27, 2017

This webinar shared what we’ve learned so far from our Links of Care pilot project. The Links of Care pilots seek to improve colorectal cancer screening and follow up care for uninsured and underinsured patients by strengthening relationships between community health centers and the surrounding medical neighborhood. Speakers provided a brief overview of their specific pilot site, and discussed implementation, workflows, and lessons learned.

Background: In 2012, the Health Resources Service Administration (HRSA) began requiring Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) to measure and report colorectal cancer screening rates. FQHCs were concerned about securing follow up care for patients with an abnormal diagnosis, as follow-up services are often prohibitively expensive for low-income, uninsured patients. To address this challenge, the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the NCCRT implemented the Links of Care pilot program to promote collaboration between FQHCs serving low-income patients and specialty providers to secure diagnostic services. Goals were to increase timely access to specialists after an abnormal screening, implement evidence-based strategies to increase colorectal cancer screening rates, and assess project implementation.

Speakers:

  • Suzanne Lagarde, MD, MBA, FACP, Chief Executive Officer, Fair Haven Community Health Center, Connecticut
  • Julia Williams, RN, Chief Nursing Officer, Beaufort Jasper Hampton Comprehensive Health Services, Inc., South Carolina
  • Chris Singer, RN, CPHQ, Chief Operating Officer, West Side Community Health Services, Minnesota
  • Kara Riehman, PhD, Strategic Director, Evaluation & Research, American Cancer Society, Inc.