NCCRT Learning Center

The NCCRT Learning Center is a digital learning platform which features courses, tools, and other resources on colorectal cancer screening delivery and research. Current educational offerings include:

  • The Colonoscopy Needs Calculator—This tool estimates the number of colonoscopies your practice can realistically anticipate with a high-quality stool-based colorectal cancer screening program based on various screening rate goals and other data inputs. It also provides an estimation of what the total colonoscopy need would cost a system as well as a comparison between the costs of treating cancer and costs of providing colonoscopies.
  • The Communications Education Portal—This course houses our suite of market research findings on the unscreened for colorectal cancer and messaging recommendations to more effectively develop communication campaigns and resources for unscreened populations. Learners can peruse the market research findings from start to finish or jump in to find just what you need to educate, empower, and mobilize those who are not getting screened for colorectal cancer.

We plan to populate the NCCRT Learning Center with additional tools and learning modules over time. Users can create an account to track your progress, learn when new content is released, and access more courses as they become available.

 

Improving Colorectal cancer Screening: Promising Practices for State Medicaid Agencies

This report follows up on a 2015 report commissioned by the NCCRT, Colorectal Cancer Initiatives in Medicaid Agencies—A National Review. That report broadly described the activities being undertaken by Medicaid programs in all 50 states, identifying ten states that had adopted more robust approaches to colorectal cancer screening.

To develop a deeper understanding of how these higher-performing states are approaching the challenges of colorectal cancer screening, follow-up research was conducted with several of the states (Arizona, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, New York, and Oregon) that had progressed further on their efforts. 

Thus, this guide establishes nine practices that have shown sufficient promise to merit consideration by other state Medicaid agencies who wish to enhance their screening efforts for this important population.

The 9 promising practices described within this guide include: 

  1. Define a CRC Metric for State Medicaid Plans
  2. Support or Mandate Public Reporting of CRC Screening Rates
  3. Develop an Incentive Program/Value-Based Purchasing Measure for CRC
  4. Provide Education and Technical Support to Managed Care Organizations and Providers
  5. Collaborate with State Public Health Staff
  6. Work Closely with FQHCs that Serve Large Medicaid Populations
  7. Promote Evidence-Based Strategies and Interventions
  8. Facilitate Access by Covering Multiple Tests Without Cost-Sharing
  9. Promote Test Options to Overcome Compliance Barriers, Provider Shortages, Geographic Issues, and Logistical Constraints

State-by-State Colorectal Cancer Screening Landscape

This resource, developed by Exact Sciences, provides a snapshot of the colorectal cancer screening landscape in each state while also putting into context how the different states compare with each other in a range of areas. While the majority of the information included is publicly available, it is difficult to find all this information in one place. This resource is intended to help people better understand what the CRC screening landscape – from coverage to screening rates to legislation – looks like in each state.

Evaluation: The last slide includes reference links for the included information. This involved considerable time and research across multiple websites and through research from Exact Sciences’ legal team.

Permissions: Made publicly available online by Exact Sciences.

Publication date: November 2019; updated August 2020

Post date: November 3, 2020

Contact: Submit comments, questions, and suggestions to Bryan Goettel: bgoettel@exactsciences.com.

Reigniting Colorectal Cancer Screening as Communities Face and Respond to the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Playbook

This resource provides an action-oriented playbook to be adopted throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and aims to align NCCRT members, 80% pledged partners, and colorectal cancer screening advocates across the nation to work together to reignite our screening efforts appropriately, safely, and equally for all communities.

The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged efforts to address inadequate screening and inequities in colorectal cancer outcomes, hindering the progress toward our 80% in Every Community goals. In the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, leading agencies, such as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the American Cancer Society, made recommendations to delay all non-urgent procedures. Colonoscopies to detect colorectal cancer have been delayed or cancelled and patient fears about contracting COVID-19 have led to further reductions in screening. This drop has raised concern that COVID-19 related screening delays will lead to missed and advanced stage colorectal cancer diagnoses and to excess deaths from colorectal cancer. Moreover, this burden will likely not be evenly distributed as screening disparities may be exacerbated in communities and populations that are disadvantaged by both old and new challenges in the COVID-19 era.

The colorectal cancer fighting community stands prepared and well-positioned to respond to and overcome the difficult task ahead, and this document offers the latest (as of June 2020) data, research, and clinical guidelines available related to colorectal cancer screening and COVID-19. 

Aligning Statements include: 

  1. Despite the challenges we face during the pandemic, colorectal cancer remains a public health priority, and we must provide the public with safe opportunities to prevent and detect colorectal polyps and cancer.
  2. Colonoscopy remains safe, is a good option for screening, and is quickly reopening around the country, but identifying patients who should receive higher priority for colonoscopic screening is a critical step.
  3. During a time when availability of elective screening colonoscopy may be limited by the COVID-19 pandemic, colorectal cancer screening can be safely offered through at-home stool-based tests.
  4. Gaining momentum and reigniting screening activities and public messaging will be highly dependent upon local regulatory requirements, public health priorities, and policy change.

Throughout the pandemic, individuals have options to screen for colorectal cancer. There are many safe, effective, and evidence-based screening tests available, including colonoscopy and non-colonoscopy options (e.g., stool-based tests, stool-DNA tests, and CT colonography). In addition to the information included in the Playbook specific to stool-based testing and colonoscopy, CT colonography also serves as an important option for patients. Learn more in an editorial published in Abdominal Radiology (July 2020), “CT Colonography’s role in the COVID-19 pandemic: a safe(r), socially distanced total colon examination.” 

We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals and organizations. Thank you to our authors Durado Brooks, Rachel Issaka, Steven Itzkowitz, Michael Sapienza, Ma Somsouk, Richard Wender, Caleb Levell, and Emily Bell. We also extend a special note of gratitude to our committed partners, NCCRT Steering Committee members, and subject matter experts that have contributed to both reviewing and advising on this document, but also for their participation in ongoing discussions aimed at uniting and guiding the colorectal cancer community throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. And finally, we recognize the efforts of the Colorectal Cancer Alliance to provide support, in-kind staff, and continued commitment in coordinating a national response to improving colorectal cancer screening rates during the COVID-19 era. 

My CT Colonography Center Locator Tool

The American College of Radiology (ACR) is now offering the My CT Colonography Center online locator, a patient-friendly online tool to find a computed tomography (CT) colonography screening center near you.

Bracco Diagnostics, Inc. originally developed the tool, which includes 120 centers – only a portion of the more than 700 estimated centers that perform CT Colonography (CTC). The ACR will now work with stakeholders to explore ways to achieve the goal of having all facilities that perform CTC registered on a center locator. To date, there are 220 centers registered for the locator tool.

The webpage also includes patient brochures on CTC, a video of a patient receiving a CTC, and more.

Evaluation: This tool was developed as a collaborative effort with Bracco Diagnostic and ACR CTC registry participants discussing a need to increase awareness of CTC screening option for patients.


Permissions:
 Made publicly available online by the American College of Radiology.


Publication date: 
September 2019


Post date: 
April 20, 2020


Contact:
Submit comments, questions, and suggestions info@acr.org.

Colorectal Cancer Screening and Risk Assessment Workflow and Documentation Guide for Health Center NextGen Users

This Guide provides focused documentation to assist users of NextGen software to improve the process of assessing, documenting, tracking, and following up on colorectal cancer screening. The Guide gives particular attention to assessment of personal and family risk and the tracking and follow-up of screening results that are not addressed in the standard NextGen guidance documents.

The Guide was initially developed by Harbor Health Services in collaboration with the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and NACHC, with support from the American Cancer Society. 

2019 Colorectal Cancer Screening Messaging Guidebook: Recommended Messages to Reach the Unscreened

In 2018, the NCCRT and the American Cancer Society researched screened and unscreened populations to better understand and address screening disparities. The goals of the market research were to:

  • Measure general awareness of colorectal cancer screening methods.
  • Understand the rationale, attitudes, and motivations for being screened or not.
  • Analyze priority populations such as adults aged 50-54, rural dwellers, and the marketplace insured.
  • Identify logical and emotional drivers that could encourage screening.
  • Use the drivers to create and test messages that would motivate unscreened individuals.

This guidebook shares the findings and recommendations gathered from that research and is further designed to help in the education, empowerment, and mobilization of those who are not getting screened for colorectal cancer. Our hope is that our partners can take this research and the recommended messaging provided to strengthen your own communications campaigns, creating resources that resonate with the target audiences even more by using your own creativity, innovation and spokespersons.

The NCCRT would like to thank the Public Awareness and Social Media Task Group members who participated in the conceptualization of this Guidebook’s research and content. Also, a very special thank you to the 80% in Every Community Market Research Advisory Group for their participation, expertise, and oversight. 

Other Guides and Resources: 

The Hispanics/Latinos and Colorectal Cancer Companion Guide and Asian Americans and Colorectal Cancer Companion Guide introduce market research about the unscreened from these populations and include tested messages in Spanish and several Asian languages. The 2017 Communications Guidebook is also still a useful resource for developing your messaging campaigns. 

2019 Messaging Guidebook – Table of Contents (Section Downloads Below)

Other tools were developed during the 80% by 2018 campaign and can still help you promote and evaluate your communications:

More communications tools and resources will be coming soon!

 

Paying for Colorectal Cancer Screening Patient Navigation Toolkit & Interactive Website

The NCCRT and the Colorado School of Public Health have developed this suite of resources that provide practical advice on paying for and sustaining colorectal cancer screening patient navigation to help health care professionals at every stage of a navigation program. The Toolkit (PDF), originally released in 2017, has been updated in 2019, and we’ve also added an interactive website and technical assistance training modules to further support screening navigation.

The toolkit provides practical advice to help professionals at every stage in a variety of settings sustain navigation. The new, interactive website provides an overview of the fundamentals of sustainability with the Toolkit providing additional case studies, resources and support. In addition, for those agencies and organizations who are ready to apply the principles, an assessment and curriculum has been developed to guide agencies in developing their own plans for sustainability. Contact pnsustaincrc@gmail.com for inquiries about the curriculum. 

The content of the toolkit and curriculum developed was drawn from published and public information about patient navigation, as well as the experiences and expertise of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, the Colorado School of Public Health, the NCCRT Patient Navigation Toolkit Advisory Committee, and over 75 people and organizations who shared their time and expertise. Thank you to all who contributed to the toolkit, and special thanks to NCCRT Steering Committee member Andrea (Andi) Dwyer of the Colorado School of Public Health for her vision and leadership in developing this much requested resource.

View the June 27, 2019 webinar release and download the June 27, 2019 webinar slide deck to learn more. 

Watch the January 10, 2017 webinar introducing the original toolkit for more information.

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Social Media Toolkit – March 2019

This toolkit, developed by the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center, is designed to help public health professionals establish a Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month social media strategy, implement Facebook and Twitter best practices, disseminate Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month messaging, and manage and evaluate social media efforts.

This toolkit provides a short introduction to use of social media in a health system context, a list of Twitter and Facebook best practices for messages, a list of sample tweets and Facebook posts, other ideas for participating in colorectal cancer awareness month, tips on evaluating social media efforts, and a list of references and other resource links.

Public health professionals, cancer control professionals, coalitions, community-based organizations and stakeholders can all use this toolkit and adapt its messaging for their unique audiences and areas of expertise.

Evaluation: The recommendations and sample messages in the toolkit were designed using evidence-based social media and colorectal cancer messaging best practices.

Evaluation assets: The toolkit includes a section on Measuring Success, which explains how to use analytics to evaluate the impact of social media messages and campaigns.

Permissions: Made publicly available online by the GW Cancer Center.

Publication date: February 2019

Post date: September 2017, revised February 2019

Contact: Send comments, questions, and suggestions to cancercontrol@gwu.edu.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices: A Handbook for Hospitals and Health Systems

The purpose of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices: A Handbook for Hospitals and Health Systems is to provide advice on the design and delivery of a variety of effective CRC screening interventions to help all hospitals and health systems strengthen their colorectal cancer screening efforts.  With their expertise in both improving health and in serving as leaders in their communities, hospitals and health systems are uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in increasing colorectal cancer screening for those they serve.  The handbook is divided into four sections:  Critical Steps, Case Studies, Implementation, and Tools & Resources. It is intended to provide you with needed information drawn from real life examples about how to ultimately improve CRC screening rates within the hospital and health system setting.

A corresponding webinar was held in July 2018 announcing the release of the handbook and included presentations from two health systems featured in the guide. View the Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices for Hospitals and Health Systems webinar.

Many thanks to the hospitals and health systems featured in the guide for sharing their time and their tremendous expertise, as well as to handbook’s expert advisory group, which was chaired by Drs. Michael Potter and Dorothy Lane, Co-Chairs of the NCCRT Professional Education and Practice Implementation Task Group.

This handbook is dedicated to the memory of Marie LaFargue.