Webinar – 2022 NCCRT Steps Guide Update – July 25, 2022

This webinar provided an introduction to the 2022 Steps for Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates: A Manual for Primary Care Practices, an updated second edition to the first edition that was originally published in 2014. The 2022 edition includes the following updates:

  • An expanded scope to include all primary care settings
  • Current screening guidelines and new screening modalities
  • 10 case studies of exemplary practice sites
  • Updated literature references

The first edition was one of the NCCRT’s most popular resources and has been instrumental in helping primary care practices throughout the United States achieve improvements in their colorectal cancer screening rates.  The 2022 edition will be released in August 2022. 

Speakers:

  • Laura Makaroff, DO, Senior Vice President, Prevention and Early Detection, American Cancer Society
  • Keith Winfrey, MD, MPH, FACP, Chief Medical Officer, New Orleans East Louisiana Community Health Center
  • Michelle Tropper, MPH, Director of Clinical Programs, HealthEfficient
  • Frank Colangelo, MD, MS-HQS, FACP, Chief Quality Officer, Premier Medical Associates

2022 Messaging Guidebook for Black & African American People: Messages to Motivate for Colorectal Cancer Screening 

Black and African American people experience disproportionately high incidence and mortality rates from colorectal cancer (CRC), with CRC death rates almost 40% higher than those of white people. While screening is only one element of the work that needs to be done to address these CRC disparities, it is important to promote screening in the best way possible.

The 2022 Messaging Guidebook for Black & African American People: Messages to Motivate for Colorectal Cancer Screening is intended to provide you with information and tools to help you work towards closing disparity gaps by using effective, tailored cancer screening messaging to help motivate people to get screened.

 

Learn More

The guidebook is a supplement to the 2019 Colorectal Cancer Screening Messaging Guidebook: Recommended Messages to Reach the Unscreened. Based on the 2019 market research findings, the NCCRT and the American Cancer Society set out to gain a deeper understanding of the barriers to screening that Black and African American people face through our market research. The overall goal of the research was to: 

  • Gain a deeper understanding of the barriers to being screened 
  • Understanding healthcare behaviors and perceptions 
  • Understand how systemic racism and social injustice impact the Black community’s experiences within the healthcare system 
  • Uncover different motivators to encourage screening
  • Identify preferred and trusted information sources 
  • Gather reactions to potential messaging and messaging aspects to identify what elements of messaging will be most effective

This guidebook shares the findings and recommendations gathered from that research and is further designed to help educate, empower, and mobilize those not getting screened for colorectal cancer. Our vision is that our partners and advocates in the field use this guidebook to strengthen their communication campaigns and create resources that resonate with Black and African American communities.

View the June 21, 2022 webinar introducing the messaging guidebook.

Additional NCCRT market research and messaging guidance:

The NCCRT would like to thank the Public Awareness & Social Media Strategic Priority Team members and Advisory Committee, who generously offered their time and expertise to develop this guidebook’s research and content. We want to extend a special thank you to Quest Diagnostics, the Association of Black Gastroenterologists and Hepatologists, and Elevance Health Foundation for their support and guidance in conducting the market research and developing this guidebook.

Spread the Word

Black and African American adults experience disproportionally higher incidence and mortality rates from colorectal cancer. The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable’s newly released messaging guidebook provides market-research findings and research-tested messages to encourage unscreened Black and African American adults to seek colorectal cancer screening. https://www.nccrt.org/Black-Messaging-Guidebook  

Only 65% of Black adults aged 50 and older are up to date with potentially life-saving colorectal cancer screening. Download the newly released National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable messaging guidebook to uncover motivators and potential messaging mechanisms to encourage regular colorectal cancer screening among Black and African American adults. https://www.nccrt.org/Black-Messaging-Guidebook

Black & African American adults experience disproportionally higher incidence & mortality from #colorectalcancer. This new @NCCRTnews messaging guidebook can help strengthen your communications to promote #CRC screening. https://www.nccrt.org/Black-Messaging-Guidebook #80inEveryCommunity #getscreened

1 in 3 Black adults aged 50+ are not up to date with potentially life-saving #colorectalcancer screening. Download the new @NCCRTnews messaging guidebook for research-tested messages to encourage #CRC screening: https://www.nccrt.org/Black-Messaging-Guidebook #80inEveryCommunity #getscreened

Brief version:

The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable’s newly released 2022 Messaging Guidebook for Black & African American People: Messages to Motivate for Colorectal Cancer Screening  highlights new market research focused on identifying barriers to colorectal cancer screening, understanding preferred and trusted sources for receiving healthcare information, and research-tested messages to help encourage unscreened Black and African American people to seek colorectal cancer screening.

Long version:

The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable’s newly released 2022 Messaging Guidebook for Black & African American People: Messages to Motivate for Colorectal Cancer Screening  highlights new market research focused on identifying barriers to colorectal cancer screening, understanding preferred and trusted sources for receiving healthcare information, and research-tested messages to help encourage unscreened Black and African American people to seek colorectal cancer screening.

Black and African American people experience disproportionately high incidence and mortality rates from colorectal cancer, with colorectal cancer death rates almost 40% higher than those of white people. While screening is only one element of the work to address these colorectal cancer disparities, it is essential to promote screening in the best way possible. This new guidebook is intended to provide recommendations to enhance marketing and communication efforts while providing tools to strengthen communication campaigns that resonate with Black and African American communities. 

How Can Employers Save More Lives From Colorectal Cancer?

This newly updated brief shares how employers can help advance the national effort to reach colorectal cancer screening rates of 80% and higher in adults ages 45 and older.

Webinar – What Do the Data Tell Us: What Can We Learn from the Latest Colorectal Cancer Screening Rate Trends Over Time? – November 3, 2021

This webinar provided a look at the latest data that informs how we are doing as a nation with our efforts to reach an 80% colorectal cancer screening rate. The webinar included a review of the key colorectal cancer screening data sets: BRFSS, NHIS, HEDIS, and UDS. Participants heard from experts as they gave an update on where we are progressing and where we still need to focus, to help inform your work ahead. 

Speakers:

  • Lisa Richardson, MD, MPH, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NCCRT Steering Committee
  • Sepheen Byron, Assistant Vice President, Performance Measurement, National Committee for Quality Assurance
  • Neeraj Deshpande MBBS, MPH, MHA, Public Health Analyst, Quality Recognition and Health Promotion Team, Bureau of Primary Health Care/Office of Quality Improvement, DHHS/Health Resources and Services Administration
  • Stacey Fedewa, Senior Principal Scientist, Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Inc.

Note: Slides for three of the four presentations have been approved to share and can be downloaded through the button on this page. We will post the final deck and the replay to this page as soon as we receive approval to share all presentations.

Note: Data and data set measurement specifications were current as of November 3, 2021, but may become obsolete when changes are made in the future.

State-by-State Colorectal Cancer Screening Landscape

This resource, developed by Exact Sciences, provides a snapshot of the colorectal cancer screening landscape in each state while also putting into context how the different states compare with each other in a range of areas. While the majority of the information included is publicly available, it is difficult to find all this information in one place. This resource is intended to help people better understand what the CRC screening landscape – from coverage to screening rates to legislation – looks like in each state.

Evaluation: The last slide includes reference links for the included information. This involved considerable time and research across multiple websites and through research from Exact Sciences’ legal team.

Permissions: Made publicly available online by Exact Sciences.

Publication date: November 2019; updated August 2020

Post date: November 3, 2020

Contact: Submit comments, questions, and suggestions to Bryan Goettel: bgoettel@exactsciences.com.

Advanced Colorectal Polyp Brief

The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable created the Advanced Colorectal Polyp GI Brief to help endoscopists and primary care clinicians identify patients with advanced colorectal polyps, understand the epidemiology and associated risk factors, and most importantly know the risks of colorectal neoplasia for patients with advanced colorectal polyps and their first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children).

This brief aims to:

  1. Remind endoscopists that patients with an advanced colorectal polyp and their close relatives are at increased risk for advanced colorectal polyps and colorectal cancer;
  2. Keep endoscopists up to date with current guidelines; and,
  3. Provide template letters to communicate colonoscopy and pathology results, risk status, and follow-up recommendations for patients and close relatives.

Supplemental template letters: 

Learn more on how gastroenterologists and endoscopists can play a role in the national efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening rates:

2019 Colorectal Cancer Screening Messaging Guidebook: Recommended Messages to Reach the Unscreened

In 2018, the NCCRT and the American Cancer Society researched screened and unscreened populations to better understand and address screening disparities. The goals of the market research were to:

  • Measure general awareness of colorectal cancer screening methods.
  • Understand the rationale, attitudes, and motivations for being screened or not.
  • Analyze priority populations such as adults aged 50-54, rural dwellers, and the marketplace insured.
  • Identify logical and emotional drivers that could encourage screening.
  • Use the drivers to create and test messages that would motivate unscreened individuals.

This guidebook shares the findings and recommendations gathered from that research and is further designed to help in the education, empowerment, and mobilization of those who are not getting screened for colorectal cancer. Our hope is that our partners can take this research and the recommended messaging provided to strengthen your own communications campaigns, creating resources that resonate with the target audiences even more by using your own creativity, innovation and spokespersons.

The NCCRT would like to thank the Public Awareness and Social Media Task Group members who participated in the conceptualization of this Guidebook’s research and content. Also, a very special thank you to the 80% in Every Community Market Research Advisory Group for their participation, expertise, and oversight. 

Other Guides and Resources: 

The Hispanics/Latinos and Colorectal Cancer Companion Guide and Asian Americans and Colorectal Cancer Companion Guide introduce market research about the unscreened from these populations and include tested messages in Spanish and several Asian languages. The 2017 Communications Guidebook is also still a useful resource for developing your messaging campaigns. 

2019 Messaging Guidebook – Table of Contents (Section Downloads Below)

Other tools were developed during the 80% by 2018 campaign and can still help you promote and evaluate your communications:

More communications tools and resources will be coming soon!

 

80% in Every Community 2019 Messaging Guidebook: Recommended Messages to Reaching the Unscreened – July 16, 2019

This webinar provided an introduction to the 2019 80% in Every Community Messaging Guidebook: Recommended messages to reach the unscreened. The guidebook serves as a resource to both better understand the motivations, attitudes, and barriers of key unscreened populations, while it also recommends market tested messages that can educate and motivate these key audiences on the importance of colorectal cancer screening. The 2019 update to this NCCRT resource includes new findings, new population profiles, and message delivery insights that will better inform our efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% in Every Community. 

Speakers:

  • Michelle Aubertine, KS&R
  • Bill Willard, American Cancer Society

 

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices: A Handbook for Hospitals and Health Systems

The purpose of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices: A Handbook for Hospitals and Health Systems is to provide advice on the design and delivery of a variety of effective CRC screening interventions to help all hospitals and health systems strengthen their colorectal cancer screening efforts.  With their expertise in both improving health and in serving as leaders in their communities, hospitals and health systems are uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in increasing colorectal cancer screening for those they serve.  The handbook is divided into four sections:  Critical Steps, Case Studies, Implementation, and Tools & Resources. It is intended to provide you with needed information drawn from real life examples about how to ultimately improve CRC screening rates within the hospital and health system setting.

A corresponding webinar was held in July 2018 announcing the release of the handbook and included presentations from two health systems featured in the guide. View the Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices for Hospitals and Health Systems webinar.

Many thanks to the hospitals and health systems featured in the guide for sharing their time and their tremendous expertise, as well as to handbook’s expert advisory group, which was chaired by Drs. Michael Potter and Dorothy Lane, Co-Chairs of the NCCRT Professional Education and Practice Implementation Task Group.

This handbook is dedicated to the memory of Marie LaFargue.

Risk Assessment And Screening Toolkit To Detect Familial, Hereditary And Early Onset Colorectal Cancer

Limited or inaccurate family history collection and risk assessment is a major barrier to successful cancer screening. Individuals who have a first-degree relative with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at least two times more likely to develop CRC, with the risk increasing with earlier ages of diagnosis and the number of relatives diagnosed with CRC. Therefore, screening and prevention efforts must focus on those with familial or hereditary risk, which requires collecting the necessary family history information for risk assessment. Primary care clinicians play a pivotal role in identifying people at increased CRC risk and facilitating recommended screening.

This new NCCRT toolkit aims to improve the ability of primary care clinicians to systematically collect, document, and act on a family history of CRC and adenomas polyps, while also educating clinicians on the need for more timely diagnostic testing for young adults who present with alarm signs or symptoms of CRC and ensuring that those patients receive a proper diagnostic work up. This toolkit serves as a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to improve operations within practices and suggests many useful resources and tools to aid these changes. 

Companion Quick Start Guide

Accompanying the full toolkit is a short, quick start guide with recommendations on how to ease into the transition process, while still making the critical improvements necessary for successful system-wide implementation. 

Thank you to the outstanding work and guidance provided from the NCCRT Family History and Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group and the smaller project advisory group. Also, thank you to the excellent work from our project developers at The Jackson Laboratory.