NCCRT Learning Center

The NCCRT Learning Center is a digital learning platform which features courses, tools, and other resources on colorectal cancer screening delivery and research. Current educational offerings include:

  • The Colonoscopy Needs Calculator—This tool estimates the number of colonoscopies your practice can realistically anticipate with a high-quality stool-based colorectal cancer screening program based on various screening rate goals and other data inputs. It also provides an estimation of what the total colonoscopy need would cost a system as well as a comparison between the costs of treating cancer and costs of providing colonoscopies.
  • The Communications Education Portal—This course houses our suite of market research findings on the unscreened for colorectal cancer and messaging recommendations to more effectively develop communication campaigns and resources for unscreened populations. Learners can peruse the market research findings from start to finish or jump in to find just what you need to educate, empower, and mobilize those who are not getting screened for colorectal cancer.

We plan to populate the NCCRT Learning Center with additional tools and learning modules over time. Users can create an account to track your progress, learn when new content is released, and access more courses as they become available.

 

Continuing Education Courses for Healthcare Providers on Colorectal Cancer Screening

To provide up-to-date information on recommended best practices for colorectal cancer screening, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partnered with Medscape Education to create two continuing education courses for healthcare providers.

In one of these courses, Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Recommended Best Practices (0.5 CME/CNE credits), David Lieberman, MD, of Oregon Health and Science University, leads a video lecture that explains why colorectal cancer screening is important, how to determine the timing and frequency of colorectal cancer screening, recommended stool-based and direct visualization screening strategies, and how to improve screening quality with a programmatic approach and quality metrics.

The second course, CRC Screening and Surveillance: Optimizing Quality (1.0 CME/CNE credits), is a three-part clinical anthology that includes more detail on these topics and explains the role of primary care providers in stool testing and colonoscopy programs.

These free courses are available for continuing education credit. You can create a free Medscape account and view the courses at: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/946291  and https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/945988.

Evaluation: The courses were developed by nationally recognized experts in colorectal cancer screening, including primary care clinicians, gastroenterologists, and epidemiologists.

Permissions: Made publicly available online through Medscape Education.

Publication date: March 15 and 24, 2021.

Post date: March 31, 2021.

Contact: Submit comments, questions, and suggestions via the links on the Medscape Education website. 

Colorectal Cancer Screening and Risk Assessment Workflow and Documentation Guide for Health Center NextGen Users

This Guide provides focused documentation to assist users of NextGen software to improve the process of assessing, documenting, tracking, and following up on colorectal cancer screening. The Guide gives particular attention to assessment of personal and family risk and the tracking and follow-up of screening results that are not addressed in the standard NextGen guidance documents.

The Guide was initially developed by Harbor Health Services in collaboration with the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and NACHC, with support from the American Cancer Society. 

Advanced Colorectal Polyp Brief

The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable created the Advanced Colorectal Polyp GI Brief to help endoscopists and primary care clinicians identify patients with advanced colorectal polyps, understand the epidemiology and associated risk factors, and most importantly know the risks of colorectal neoplasia for patients with advanced colorectal polyps and their first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children).

This brief aims to:

  1. Remind endoscopists that patients with an advanced colorectal polyp and their close relatives are at increased risk for advanced colorectal polyps and colorectal cancer;
  2. Keep endoscopists up to date with current guidelines; and,
  3. Provide template letters to communicate colonoscopy and pathology results, risk status, and follow-up recommendations for patients and close relatives.

Supplemental template letters: 

Learn more on how gastroenterologists and endoscopists can play a role in the national efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening rates:

Clinician’s Reference: Stool-Based Tests for Colorectal Cancer Screening

This newly revised resource is designed to introduce (or reintroduce) clinicians to the value of stool-based testing for colorectal cancer. It explains the different types of stool-based tests available—Fecal Immunochemical Tests (FIT), High-Sensitivity Fecal Occult Blood Tests (HS-gFOBT) and FIT-DNA testing—and provides guidance on implementing high quality stool-based screening programs. The resource now includes information on sensitivity and specificity for many of the most commonly used tests.

We would like to thank the following individuals, many from the NCCRT Professional Education and Practice Implementation Task Group, for reviewing past and current versions of this resource and contributing to this work: James Allison, Kim Andrews, Barry Berger, Durado Brooks, Gloria Coronado, Debbie Kirkland, Theodore Levin, Dorothy Lane, Laura Makaroff, Marion Nadel, Kerstin Ohlander, Mike Potter, Robert Smith, and Richard Wender. We’d also like to thank the Comprehensive Cancer Control Program National Partners for providing funding support.

The Dos and Don’ts of Colorectal Cancer Screening

This one-page flyer may be used to remind clinicians about some of the dos and don’ts when it comes to colorectal cancer screening.

Partners may have the option to cobrand the flyer with their organization’s logo. Contact your local American Cancer Society to learn more.

80% in Every Community 2019 Messaging Guidebook: Recommended Messages to Reaching the Unscreened – July 16, 2019

This webinar provided an introduction to the 2019 80% in Every Community Messaging Guidebook: Recommended messages to reach the unscreened. The guidebook serves as a resource to both better understand the motivations, attitudes, and barriers of key unscreened populations, while it also recommends market tested messages that can educate and motivate these key audiences on the importance of colorectal cancer screening. The 2019 update to this NCCRT resource includes new findings, new population profiles, and message delivery insights that will better inform our efforts to improve colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% in Every Community. 

Speakers:

  • Michelle Aubertine, KS&R
  • Bill Willard, American Cancer Society

 

Paying for Colorectal Cancer Screening Patient Navigation Toolkit & Interactive Website

The NCCRT and the Colorado School of Public Health have developed this suite of resources that provide practical advice on paying for and sustaining colorectal cancer screening patient navigation to help health care professionals at every stage of a navigation program. The Toolkit (PDF), originally released in 2017, has been updated in 2019, and we’ve also added an interactive website and technical assistance training modules to further support screening navigation.

The toolkit provides practical advice to help professionals at every stage in a variety of settings sustain navigation. The new, interactive website provides an overview of the fundamentals of sustainability with the Toolkit providing additional case studies, resources and support. In addition, for those agencies and organizations who are ready to apply the principles, an assessment and curriculum has been developed to guide agencies in developing their own plans for sustainability. Contact pnsustaincrc@gmail.com for inquiries about the curriculum. 

The content of the toolkit and curriculum developed was drawn from published and public information about patient navigation, as well as the experiences and expertise of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, the Colorado School of Public Health, the NCCRT Patient Navigation Toolkit Advisory Committee, and over 75 people and organizations who shared their time and expertise. Thank you to all who contributed to the toolkit, and special thanks to NCCRT Steering Committee member Andrea (Andi) Dwyer of the Colorado School of Public Health for her vision and leadership in developing this much requested resource.

View the June 27, 2019 webinar release and download the June 27, 2019 webinar slide deck to learn more. 

Watch the January 10, 2017 webinar introducing the original toolkit for more information.

Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit to Detect Familial, Hereditary, and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer – June 19, 2018

This webinar introduced a new NCCRT resource for primary care providers, Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit to Detect Familial, Hereditary and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer.  The new toolkit aims to improve the ability of primary care clinicians to systematically collect, document, and act on a family history of CRC and adenomas polyps, while also educating clinicians on the need for more timely diagnostic testing for young adults who present with alarm signs or symptoms of CRC and ensuring that those patients receive a proper diagnostic work up.  Speakers include:

  • Emily Edelman, MS, CGC, Associate Director, Clinical & Continuing Education, The Jackson Laboratory;
  • Dennis Ahnen, MD, Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado School of Medicine, NCCRT Steering Committee, NCCRT Co-Chair Family History and Early Age Onset CRC Task Group;
  • Paul Schroy, MD, MPH,  Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, NCCRT Co-Chair Family History and Early Age Onset CRC Task Group;
  • Thomas Weber, MD, Director of Surgical Oncology, Northwest Region at Northwell Health, NCCRT Chair Emeritus, NCCRT Co-Chair Family History and Early Age Onset CRC Task Group. 

 

Risk Assessment And Screening Toolkit To Detect Familial, Hereditary And Early Onset Colorectal Cancer

Limited or inaccurate family history collection and risk assessment is a major barrier to successful cancer screening. Individuals who have a first-degree relative with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at least two times more likely to develop CRC, with the risk increasing with earlier ages of diagnosis and the number of relatives diagnosed with CRC. Therefore, screening and prevention efforts must focus on those with familial or hereditary risk, which requires collecting the necessary family history information for risk assessment. Primary care clinicians play a pivotal role in identifying people at increased CRC risk and facilitating recommended screening.

This new NCCRT toolkit aims to improve the ability of primary care clinicians to systematically collect, document, and act on a family history of CRC and adenomas polyps, while also educating clinicians on the need for more timely diagnostic testing for young adults who present with alarm signs or symptoms of CRC and ensuring that those patients receive a proper diagnostic work up. This toolkit serves as a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to improve operations within practices and suggests many useful resources and tools to aid these changes. 

Companion Quick Start Guide

Accompanying the full toolkit is a short, quick start guide with recommendations on how to ease into the transition process, while still making the critical improvements necessary for successful system-wide implementation. 

Thank you to the outstanding work and guidance provided from the NCCRT Family History and Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group and the smaller project advisory group. Also, thank you to the excellent work from our project developers at The Jackson Laboratory.