NCCRT Learning Center

The NCCRT Learning Center is a digital learning platform which features courses, tools, and other resources on colorectal cancer screening delivery and research. Current educational offerings include:

  • The Colonoscopy Needs Calculator—This tool estimates the number of colonoscopies your practice can realistically anticipate with a high-quality stool-based colorectal cancer screening program based on various screening rate goals and other data inputs. It also provides an estimation of what the total colonoscopy need would cost a system as well as a comparison between the costs of treating cancer and costs of providing colonoscopies.
  • The Communications Education Portal—This course houses our suite of market research findings on the unscreened for colorectal cancer and messaging recommendations to more effectively develop communication campaigns and resources for unscreened populations. Learners can peruse the market research findings from start to finish or jump in to find just what you need to educate, empower, and mobilize those who are not getting screened for colorectal cancer.

We plan to populate the NCCRT Learning Center with additional tools and learning modules over time. Users can create an account to track your progress, learn when new content is released, and access more courses as they become available.

 

Continuing Education Courses for Healthcare Providers on Colorectal Cancer Screening

To provide up-to-date information on recommended best practices for colorectal cancer screening, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partnered with Medscape Education to create two continuing education courses for healthcare providers.

In one of these courses, Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Recommended Best Practices (0.5 CME/CNE credits), David Lieberman, MD, of Oregon Health and Science University, leads a video lecture that explains why colorectal cancer screening is important, how to determine the timing and frequency of colorectal cancer screening, recommended stool-based and direct visualization screening strategies, and how to improve screening quality with a programmatic approach and quality metrics.

The second course, CRC Screening and Surveillance: Optimizing Quality (1.0 CME/CNE credits), is a three-part clinical anthology that includes more detail on these topics and explains the role of primary care providers in stool testing and colonoscopy programs.

These free courses are available for continuing education credit. You can create a free Medscape account and view the courses at: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/946291  and https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/945988.

Evaluation: The courses were developed by nationally recognized experts in colorectal cancer screening, including primary care clinicians, gastroenterologists, and epidemiologists.

Permissions: Made publicly available online through Medscape Education.

Publication date: March 15 and 24, 2021.

Post date: March 31, 2021.

Contact: Submit comments, questions, and suggestions via the links on the Medscape Education website. 

The Dos and Don’ts of Colorectal Cancer Screening

This one-page flyer may be used to remind clinicians about some of the dos and don’ts when it comes to colorectal cancer screening.

Partners may have the option to cobrand the flyer with their organization’s logo. Contact your local American Cancer Society to learn more.

Colorectal Cancer Screening In American Indian & Alaska Native Communities – November 28, 2017

This webinar explored the opportunities and barriers related to delivering quality colorectal cancer screening and follow-up care in health care settings serving American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. The webinar provided a review of basic basic data on colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and screening rates in AI/AN populations, an overview of the American Cancer Society and the NCCRT’s work to address this issue, and presentations from two AI/AN-serving healthcare systems about their innovative approaches to increasing colorectal cancer screening.

Learn more about the American Cancer Society and the NCCRT’s work to address this issue in the post-meeting report from the April 2016 one-day summit to explore the challenges and potential solutions to improving access to quality colorectal cancer screening in this population.

Speakers:

  • Kris Rhodes, MPH, Chief Executive Officer, American Indian Cancer Foundation (Moderator)
  • Laura Makaroff, DO, Senior Director, Cancer Control Intervention, American Cancer Society, Inc.
  • Jessica Deaton, RN, BSN, Care Manager, Oklahoma City Indian Clinic
  • Richard Mousseau, MS, Director, Community Health Prevention Programs, Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board
best practices handbook for health plans

“Thank you! This is exactly the type of information health plans need to pass to one another to improve partnership/collaboration, as the consumer will benefit at the end.”

“I really enjoyed that each of the health plans featured in the toolkit highlights a different intervention or opportunity. That gives our partners many approaches to choose from.”

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Health Plans

Health plans have an essential role to play in the effort to screen more Americans for colorectal cancer, particularly given that seven out of 10 people who are unscreened are covered by insurance.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Health Plans, provides a first-of-its-kind compilation of best practices, case studies, templates and tools, that will kick start or infuse health plans’ efforts to save more lives and prevent more cancers.

To develop the handbook, the NCCRT convened an advisory group of health plan experts and interviewed high-performing health plans to understand what works and what doesn’t when it comes to increasing screening among members. Thank you to the many individuals and organizations who contributed their time and expertise to developing this much requested resource.

In the future, we hope to update this handbook with more case studies from high-performing health plans. If you have a story to share about how your health plan has worked to raise colorectal cancer screening rates, please email nccrt@cancer.org.

NCCRT’s issue brief, The Importance of Waiving Cost-sharing for Follow-up Colonoscopies, provides additional information on the colonoscopy copay issue.

View the March 28, 2017 webinar introducing the Handbook for a guided tour of the best practices, case studies, and templates and tools found within the handbook, and hear from one of the profiled health plans.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook For Health Plans

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Health Plans – March 28, 2017

This webinar introduced the new NCCRT Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Health Plans. The purpose of this handbook is to provide health plans with advice on the design and delivery of effective colorectal cancer screening programs. The webinar provided participants with a guided tour of the best practices, case studies, and templates and tools found within the handbook, including a deeper dive into the exemplary practices for one of the profiled health plans.

Speakers:

  • Tamara O’Shaughnessy, QNA Group
  • Anshul Dixit, MD, MPH, MBA, Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield

“This was one of the best colorectal cancer presentations, and it also provided information we can readily utilize with our current health plans in support of the 80% by 2018 initiative.”

What Can Gastroenterologists & Endoscopists Do To Advance 80% By 2018?

Learn how gastroenterologists and endoscopists can be part of the national effort to make sure 80% of adults ages 50 and older are regularly screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.

Review the supplement to this brief, Identifying High Risk Patients and Families in Your Practice, for guidance on steps you can take to ensure your patients and their families receive timely and appropriate screening.

What can women’s health providers do to advance 80% by 2018?

Learn how women’s health providers can be part of the national effort to make sure 80% of adults ages 50 and older are regularly screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.

EHR Best Practice Workflow and Documentation Guide to Support Colorectal Cancer Screening Improvement with eClinicalWorks

The NCCRT commissioned the Health Center Network of New York (HCNNY) to develop EHR Best Practice Workflow and Documentation Guide to Support Colorectal Cancer Screening Improvement with eClinicalWorks. Please note that this tool is an advanced tool designed to inform those who work directly with electronic health records (EHRs). The overall goal of the project was to identify and document specific best practice workflows that support appropriate CRC screening and follow up and proper utilization of family history data within the eClinicalWorks EHR system (eCW). The guide is also intended to further enable FQHCs to employ existing CRC screening improvement tools to ultimately yield improved patient health outcomes. HCNNY will continue to enhance the guide as further information and/or product capabilities related to CRC screening become known. HCNNY and its participating FQHCs learned a great deal throughout this project and while the challenges of ensuring timely CRC screening for all patients are far from resolved, the detailed recommendations developed provide a roadmap for documentation that will assist health centers in building the necessary foundation for more reliable, actionable information to support their efforts to improve CRC screening rates. We are thankful for the support and collaboration from the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD) in developing this tool.

Watch the May 5, 2016 webinar introducing this new resource to learn more.

What Can Insurers Do To Advance 80% By 2018?

Learn how health insurers can be part of the national effort to make sure 80% of adults ages 50 and older are regularly screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.