Continuing Education Courses for Healthcare Providers on Colorectal Cancer Screening

To provide up-to-date information on recommended best practices for colorectal cancer screening, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partnered with Medscape Education to create two continuing education courses for healthcare providers.

In one of these courses, Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Recommended Best Practices (0.5 CME/CNE credits), David Lieberman, MD, of Oregon Health and Science University, leads a video lecture that explains why colorectal cancer screening is important, how to determine the timing and frequency of colorectal cancer screening, recommended stool-based and direct visualization screening strategies, and how to improve screening quality with a programmatic approach and quality metrics.

The second course, CRC Screening and Surveillance: Optimizing Quality (1.0 CME/CNE credits), is a three-part clinical anthology that includes more detail on these topics and explains the role of primary care providers in stool testing and colonoscopy programs.

These free courses are available for continuing education credit. You can create a free Medscape account and view the courses at: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/946291  and https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/945988.

Evaluation: The courses were developed by nationally recognized experts in colorectal cancer screening, including primary care clinicians, gastroenterologists, and epidemiologists.

Permissions: Made publicly available online through Medscape Education.

Publication date: March 15 and 24, 2021.

Post date: March 31, 2021.

Contact: Submit comments, questions, and suggestions via the links on the Medscape Education website. 

Clinician’s Reference: Stool-Based Tests for Colorectal Cancer Screening

This newly revised resource is designed to introduce (or reintroduce) clinicians to the value of stool-based testing for colorectal cancer. It explains the different types of stool-based tests available—Fecal Immunochemical Tests (FIT), High-Sensitivity Fecal Occult Blood Tests (HS-gFOBT) and FIT-DNA testing—and provides guidance on implementing high quality stool-based screening programs. The resource now includes information on sensitivity and specificity for many of the most commonly used tests.

We would like to thank the following individuals, many from the NCCRT Professional Education and Practice Implementation Task Group, for reviewing past and current versions of this resource and contributing to this work: James Allison, Kim Andrews, Barry Berger, Durado Brooks, Gloria Coronado, Debbie Kirkland, Theodore Levin, Dorothy Lane, Laura Makaroff, Marion Nadel, Kerstin Ohlander, Mike Potter, Robert Smith, and Richard Wender. We’d also like to thank the Comprehensive Cancer Control Program National Partners for providing funding support.

Paying for Colorectal Cancer Screening Patient Navigation Toolkit & Interactive Website

The NCCRT and the Colorado School of Public Health have developed this suite of resources that provide practical advice on paying for and sustaining colorectal cancer screening patient navigation to help health care professionals at every stage of a navigation program. The Toolkit (PDF), originally released in 2017, has been updated in 2019, and we’ve also added an interactive website and technical assistance training modules to further support screening navigation.

The toolkit provides practical advice to help professionals at every stage in a variety of settings sustain navigation. The new, interactive website provides an overview of the fundamentals of sustainability with the Toolkit providing additional case studies, resources and support. In addition, for those agencies and organizations who are ready to apply the principles, an assessment and curriculum has been developed to guide agencies in developing their own plans for sustainability. Contact pnsustaincrc@gmail.com for inquiries about the curriculum. 

The content of the toolkit and curriculum developed was drawn from published and public information about patient navigation, as well as the experiences and expertise of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, the Colorado School of Public Health, the NCCRT Patient Navigation Toolkit Advisory Committee, and over 75 people and organizations who shared their time and expertise. Thank you to all who contributed to the toolkit, and special thanks to NCCRT Steering Committee member Andrea (Andi) Dwyer of the Colorado School of Public Health for her vision and leadership in developing this much requested resource.

View the June 27, 2019 webinar release and download the June 27, 2019 webinar slide deck to learn more. 

Watch the January 10, 2017 webinar introducing the original toolkit for more information.

Risk Assessment And Screening Toolkit To Detect Familial, Hereditary And Early Onset Colorectal Cancer

Limited or inaccurate family history collection and risk assessment is a major barrier to successful cancer screening. Individuals who have a first-degree relative with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at least two times more likely to develop CRC, with the risk increasing with earlier ages of diagnosis and the number of relatives diagnosed with CRC. Therefore, screening and prevention efforts must focus on those with familial or hereditary risk, which requires collecting the necessary family history information for risk assessment. Primary care clinicians play a pivotal role in identifying people at increased CRC risk and facilitating recommended screening.

This new NCCRT toolkit aims to improve the ability of primary care clinicians to systematically collect, document, and act on a family history of CRC and adenomas polyps, while also educating clinicians on the need for more timely diagnostic testing for young adults who present with alarm signs or symptoms of CRC and ensuring that those patients receive a proper diagnostic work up. This toolkit serves as a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to improve operations within practices and suggests many useful resources and tools to aid these changes. 

Companion Quick Start Guide

Accompanying the full toolkit is a short, quick start guide with recommendations on how to ease into the transition process, while still making the critical improvements necessary for successful system-wide implementation. 

Thank you to the outstanding work and guidance provided from the NCCRT Family History and Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group and the smaller project advisory group. Also, thank you to the excellent work from our project developers at The Jackson Laboratory. 

 

Innovative Ways To Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Among The Underserved – February 20, 2018

This webinar was a repeat of one of our most highly rated workshops from the NCCRT meeting last month. The purpose of the webinar was to move beyond describing the challenges of reaching the underserved to showcasing innovative solutions, including using systems change to increase colorectal cancer screening in a multi-ethnic community; providing an example of how local health departments can team up with academics on community engagement; and partnering with emergency departments to reach rural residents who don’t have a primary care provider.

Speakers:

  • Joseph Ravenell, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Population Health and Medicine; Associate Dean for Diversity Affairs and Inclusion at NYU School of Medicine; NCCRT Steering Committee (Presenter/Moderator)
  • Karen E. Kim, MD, Professor of Medicine, Dean, Faculty Affairs, Associate Director, Cancer Disparities, the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Jenna Hatcher, RN, PhD, MPH, Director of Diversity and Inclusion, University of Kentucky, College of Nursing

Colorectal Cancer Screening In American Indian & Alaska Native Communities – November 28, 2017

This webinar explored the opportunities and barriers related to delivering quality colorectal cancer screening and follow-up care in health care settings serving American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. The webinar provided a review of basic basic data on colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and screening rates in AI/AN populations, an overview of the American Cancer Society and the NCCRT’s work to address this issue, and presentations from two AI/AN-serving healthcare systems about their innovative approaches to increasing colorectal cancer screening.

Learn more about the American Cancer Society and the NCCRT’s work to address this issue in the post-meeting report from the April 2016 one-day summit to explore the challenges and potential solutions to improving access to quality colorectal cancer screening in this population.

Speakers:

  • Kris Rhodes, MPH, Chief Executive Officer, American Indian Cancer Foundation (Moderator)
  • Laura Makaroff, DO, Senior Director, Cancer Control Intervention, American Cancer Society, Inc.
  • Jessica Deaton, RN, BSN, Care Manager, Oklahoma City Indian Clinic
  • Richard Mousseau, MS, Director, Community Health Prevention Programs, Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board
best practices handbook for health plans

“Thank you! This is exactly the type of information health plans need to pass to one another to improve partnership/collaboration, as the consumer will benefit at the end.”

“I really enjoyed that each of the health plans featured in the toolkit highlights a different intervention or opportunity. That gives our partners many approaches to choose from.”

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Health Plans

Health plans have an essential role to play in the effort to screen more Americans for colorectal cancer, particularly given that seven out of 10 people who are unscreened are covered by insurance.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices Handbook for Health Plans, provides a first-of-its-kind compilation of best practices, case studies, templates and tools, that will kick start or infuse health plans’ efforts to save more lives and prevent more cancers.

To develop the handbook, the NCCRT convened an advisory group of health plan experts and interviewed high-performing health plans to understand what works and what doesn’t when it comes to increasing screening among members. Thank you to the many individuals and organizations who contributed their time and expertise to developing this much requested resource.

In the future, we hope to update this handbook with more case studies from high-performing health plans. If you have a story to share about how your health plan has worked to raise colorectal cancer screening rates, please email nccrt@cancer.org.

NCCRT’s issue brief, The Importance of Waiving Cost-sharing for Follow-up Colonoscopies, provides additional information on the colonoscopy copay issue.

View the March 28, 2017 webinar introducing the Handbook for a guided tour of the best practices, case studies, and templates and tools found within the handbook, and hear from one of the profiled health plans.

How To Pay For Screening Navigation Toolkit

How to Pay for Screening Navigation Toolkit – January 10, 2017

This webinar introduced the NCCRT and the Colorado School of Public Health’s new toolkit: Paying for Colorectal Cancer Screening Patient Navigation ToolkitThe toolkit provides practical advice on paying for and sustaining colorectal cancer screening patient navigation. It’s designed to help health care professionals at various stages of establishing a screening navigation program. While there are no magic wand solutions, we are confident you will find this a comprehensive look at how various programs have sustained their work of interest.

Speakers:

  • Andrea (Andi) Dwyer, Colorado School of Public Health

FluFIT Program

FluFIT programs increase colorectal cancer screening rates by providing a take home fecal immunochemical test (FIT) to eligible patients when they receive their annual flu shot. Thus, the annual flu shot campaign create an opportunity to reach people who are also due for colorectal screening.

The FluFIT website offers program planning and implementational materials, including staff training, work flows, log sheets, sample reminder letters, and sample telephone call scripts. The site also provides patient educational materials, such as clinic posters, and FIT instructions (both printed materials and videos) in several languages. These materials can help prepare a healthcare team to develop the simple systems needed to implement a FluFIT program and jump start program development.

FluFIT programs have been implemented successfully in a variety of clinical settings. Many FluFIT campaigns are run by nurses, pharmacists, or medical assistants. They can be implemented and sustained with limited resources, are well accepted by patients, and can lead to higher screening rates.

Evaluation: FluFIT is a research-tested program. Visit the Publications section of the website to find research articles and reviews of the FluFIT approach.

Evaluation Assets: The Program Materials section of the website includes a sample FluFIT log sheet and sample FluFIT results tracking sheet.

Permissions: Made publicly available online by the Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California.

Publication date: 2009; updated in 2017

Post date: September 15, 2017

Contact: Send comments, questions, and suggestions to Michael Potter, MD at potterm@fcm.ucsf.edu.

New Hampshire Colorectal Cancer Screening Program Patient Navigation Model Replication Manual

The New Hampshire Colorectal Cancer Screening Program (NHCRCSP) patient navigation model has been highly effective in increasing the completion and quality of colonoscopy screening and surveillance among statewide underserved groups. Patients in this program, all of whom were navigated, were 11 times more likely to complete colonoscopy than non-navigated patients in a comparison group. Given this success, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the NHCRCSP worked together to develop a manual to help others replicate the model. The manual includes step-by-step instructions for implementing a screening navigation program, including a detailed navigation protocol, guidance on data collection, navigator training, and sample templates and tools.

Intended Audiences: Any organization that conducts colorectal cancer screening or administers a colonoscopy program may benefit from implementing this intervention. Organizations could include health systems, endoscopy centers, primary care practices (including Federally Qualified Health Centers), universities, state or local health departments, and grantee programs. This manual also may be useful for health care providers, pharmacy staff, and other community partners to clarify their roles in the intervention and how it benefits their patients.

Congratulations to former NCCRT Steering Committee member Dr. Lynn Butterly and to all the others who helped create this resource.

Evaluation: A rigorous evaluation was conducted, including a comparison of NHCRCSP-navigated patients to a similar group of non-navigated patients. Learn more on page 8 and in Appendix D. Evaluation results were also published in the journal Cancer.

Permissions: Made publicly available online through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Publication date: October 2016

Post date: September 18, 2017

Contact: Send comments, questions, and suggestions to NHPNManual@cdc.gov or NHCRCSP@hitchcock.org.